2014 10K FY_Taxonomy2013

 


 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C.  20549

  

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2014

TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from          to           

 

Commission File Number 000-19608

ARI Network Services, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WISCONSIN

 

39-1388360

 

 

(State or other jurisdiction or organization)

 

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10850 West Park Place, Suite 1200,

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

 

53224

 

 

(Address of principal executive office)

 

(Zip Code)

 

 

(414) 973-4300

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: 

        Name of each exchange

       Title of each class     on which registered

Common Stock, par value                    

      $0.001 per share                                NASDAQ Capital Market

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

 

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act     Yes     No    

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act.    Yes     No    

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes     No   

 

Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes     No   

 

Indicate by check if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (S229.405 of this chapter)  is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one): 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer  

Accelerated filer  

Non-accelerated filer  

Smaller reporting company  

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes     No    

 


 

The aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, based on the closing price of the registrant’s common stock on January 31, 2014 as reported on the NASDAQ Capital Market, was $21,000,000.

 

As of October 20, 2014, there were 14,197,438 shares of the registrant’s shares outstanding.

2


 

ARI Network Services, Inc.

 

FORM 10-K

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JULY 31, 2014

INDEX

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page

PART I

Item 1

Business

4

Item 1A

Risk Factors

11

Item 2

Properties

16

Item 3

Legal Proceedings

16

Item 4

Mine Safety Disclosures

16

PART II

Item 5

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

17

Item 6

Selected Financial Data

17

Item 7

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

17

Item 7A

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

29

Item 8

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

29

Item 9

Changes In and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

29

Item 9A

Controls and Procedures

29

Item 9B

Other Information

30

PART III

Item 10

Directors, Executive Officers, and Corporate Governance

31

Item 11

Executive Compensation

34

Item 12

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

39

Item 13

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence

41

Item 14

Principal Accountant Fees and Services 

42

PART IV

Item 15

Exhibits

43

Signatures 

 

45

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

45

 

Consolidated Financial Statements

47

 

3


 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K, including the section titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7, contains forward-looking statements regarding future events and our future results that are subject to the safe harbors created under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”) and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). All statements other than statements of historical facts are statements that could be deemed to be forward-looking statements. These statements are based on current expectations, estimates, forecasts, and projections about the markets in which we operate and the beliefs and assumptions of our management. Words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “targets,” “goals,” “projects,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates,”  “endeavors,” “strives,” “may,” variations of such words, and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. In addition, any statements that refer to projections of our future financial performance, our anticipated growth and trends in our businesses, and other characterizations of future events or circumstances are forward-looking statements. Readers are cautioned that these forward-looking statements are only predictions and are subject to risks, uncertainties, and assumptions that are difficult to predict, estimate, or verify, including those identified below under “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and elsewhere herein. Therefore, actual results may differ materially and adversely from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to revise or update any forward-looking statements for any reason.

 

PART I

 

Item 1.  Business

Overview

ARI Network Services, Inc. offers an award-winning suite of data-driven software tools and marketing services to help dealers, equipment manufacturers and distributors in selected vertical markets Sell More Stuff!™ – online and in-store. Our innovative products are powered by a proprietary data repository of enriched original equipment and aftermarket electronic content spanning more than 10.5 million active part and accessory SKUs, 469,000 models and $1.7 billion in retail product value. Business is complicated, but we believe our customers’ technology tools don’t have to be. We remove the complexity of selling and servicing new and used vehicle inventory, parts, garments and accessories (“PG&A”) for customers in the automotive tire and wheel aftermarket(“ATW”), powersports, outdoor power equipment (“OPE”), marine, home medical equipment (“HME”), recreational vehicles (“RV”) and appliance industries. More than 22,000 equipment dealers, 195 distributors and 1,500 manufacturers worldwide leverage our web and eCatalog platforms to Sell More Stuff!™

We were incorporated in Wisconsin in 1981.  Our principal executive office and headquarters is located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  The office address is 10850 West Park Place, Suite 1200, Milwaukee, WI 53224, and our telephone number at that location is (414) 973-4300. Our principal website address is www.arinet.com.  ARI also maintains operations in Duluth, Minnesota; Cypress, California; Floyds Knobs, Indiana; and Leiden, The Netherlands

Our Solutions

Our software as a service (“SaaS”) and data as a service (“DaaS”) solutions include: (i) eCommerce-enabled websites, which provide a web presence for dealers and serve as a platform for driving leads and eCommerce sales; (ii) eCatalog content, which drives sales of inventory and PG&A both online and within the dealership; and (iii) lead management software designed to increase sales for dealers through more efficient management and improved closure of leads.  Our solutions also improve our customers’ overall customer satisfaction through a highly efficient and accurate data lookup experience at the parts counter and a quicker response time to online inquiries, both of which serve to significantly improve a customer’s overall experience with the dealer.

 

Our SaaS and DaaS solutions are sold through our internal sales force and are composed primarily of recurring license and eCatalog subscriptions.  Customers typically sign annual, auto-renewing contracts.  Today, more than 90% of our revenues are recurring.

 

In addition to our award-winning SaaS and DaaS solutions, ARI offers a suite of complementary products and services designed to supplement our three primary offerings in order to help our customers Sell More Stuff!™

 

Web Platform Solutions

 

Our eCommerce-enabled website solutions provide consumers with information about a dealership and its product lines through our extensive library of electronic catalog content and allow consumers to obtain information on whole goods and purchase PG&A via the dealers’ website 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  Our website solutions are tailored to each of the vertical markets we serve and tightly integrated with our electronic library of inventory and PG&A content.  We also offer a mobile solution that allows dealers’ websites to be fully functional on smart mobile phones.

 

4


 

Websites are sold through our inside sales teams, which are aligned by vertical market.  The sales process will typically include a live demo of the site and may even include a free trial period (we refer to these as “test drives”). We typically charge a nominal, one-time set-up fee to develop a new dealer website, monthly recurring subscription fees and variable transaction fees.  Our website solutions are typically sold under one year, renewable contracts with monthly payment terms.  We estimate that as of July 31, 2014, we host and maintain more than 6,100 websites for dealers in all of our vertical markets.  Websites have become ARI’s largest source of revenue and accounted for 51% of total revenue during fiscal 2014.

 

eCatalog Platform Solutions

 

Our eCatalog solutions, which encompass our PartSmart®, PartSmart Web™, PartStream™ and AccessorySmartTM products, leverage our industry-leading library of electronic whole goods and PG&A content to allow distributors and dealers to view and interact with this information to efficiently support the sales and service of equipment.  We believe that our eCatalog solution is the fastest and most efficient in the market, as it allows multi-line dealers to quickly access data for any of the brands serviced from within the same software, allowing the dealer’s parts and service operations to more quickly identify, locate and sell products and services to their customers. Our eCatalog solutions include:

 

PartSmart®, our CD-based electronic parts catalog, is used by dealers worldwide in the OPE, powersports, marine, appliance and agricultural equipment industries to increase productivity by significantly reducing parts lookup time.  Our PartSmart® software is designed to allow multi-line dealers to look up parts and service information for all manufacturer product lines that the dealer carries, and integrates with more than 90 of the leading dealer business management systems.

 

PartSmart Web™, a SaaS solution, is used by distributors and manufacturers to provide their dealers with access to parts and pricing information via the Internet. 

 

PartStream™, a SaaS solution, is a modular, consumer-focused illustrated parts lookup application that integrates with existing dealer and distributor websites and shopping carts and allows consumers to quickly identify the desired part, add the part to their electronic shopping cart and check out.  It leverages ARI’s parts content, delivering it to PartStream™ users on demand from ARI servers.

 

AccessorySmartTM,  a SaaS solution, is the only aftermarket PG&A lookup product of its kind, providing access to more than 500,000 SKUs from more than 1,400 powersports aftermarket manufacturers.  AccessorySmart provides parts and service counter personnel a one-stop resource to look up products, cost and availability for all of the leading aftermarket PG&A distributors.  AccessorySmart significantly decreases the time it takes to look up PG&A information and availability, allowing dealers to service and sell more stuff to customers on a given day.

 

Our eCatalog products are sold through our dedicated internal sales team and accounted for approximately 43% of our total revenue during fiscal 2014.  Fees charged for the use of our eCatalog products include a recurring license fee, subscription fees for subscribed catalogs, and in some cases, page view fees.

 

Lead Management Product

 

Our award-winning SaaS solution, Footsteps™, is designed to efficiently manage and nurture generated leads, increasing conversion rates and ultimately revenues for our customers. Footsteps™ connects equipment manufacturers with their dealer channel through lead consolidation and distribution, and allows the dealers to handle leads more efficiently and professionally through marketing automation and business management system integration.  The product is used as a complete database of customers and prospects, and manages the dealer-to-customer relationship, from generating email campaigns and automated responses, to providing sales teams with a daily follow-up calendar and reminder notices.   We derived approximately 3% of our revenues from Footsteps™ during fiscal 2014.

 

Digital Marketing

 

Our digital marketing solutions provide lead generation tools through search engine optimization, social media marketing and website enhancements, which serve to increase traffic to our eCommerce platform and at the dealership, in addition to increasing on-line sales and leads.  We derived approximately 1% of our revenues from digital marketing services during fiscal 2014.  Digital marketing services is a relatively new service offering by ARI and in the third quarter of fiscal 2014, we went to market with a more robust offering in the space as a result of our continued integration of the DUO Web Solutions business (“DUO”) we acquired in November 2013.

 

5


 

Other Solutions

 

We also offer a suite of complementary solutions, which include software, website customization, professional services and hosting services. On a combined basis, these other services accounted for approximately 2% of revenue during fiscal 2014.

 

Our Growth Strategy

 

ARI’s goal is to become the leading provider of SaaS and DaaS solutions that help our customers, efficiently and effectively sell more major units, replacement parts, accessories, and service – in other words, to Sell More Stuff!™   Our continued goal is to grow revenues at a double-digit rate and to grow earnings through scalability.  We will accomplish this goal by deploying our solutions to dealers, distributors, manufacturers, service providers, and consumers in selected vertical markets where the finished goods are complex equipment requiring service that are primarily sold and serviced through an independent dealer channel.  We believe this strategy will drive increased value to our shareholders, employees, and customers. 

 

We also believe the execution of the following strategic pillars will enable us to achieve the growth and profitability needed to drive long-term sustainable value for our shareholders.  These strategic foundations are primarily centered on enhancing the value proposition to our customers, which will lead to additional revenues through pricing actions, product and feature upsells, reduced customer churn rates, and expansion by leveraging our core competencies in new complimentary markets. Each of these strategic pillars is a long-term foundation for growth; within each we have established near-term goals, as discussed below.

 

Drive organic growth through innovative new solutions, differentiated content, entering new markets and expanding geographically. 

 

As a subscription-based, recurring revenue (“RR”) business, the most important drivers of future growth are nurturing and defending our customer base, developing and selling additional products to our existing customer base, and acquiring new customers.  We define RR as revenue from products and services which are subscription-based and renewable, including software access fees, data content fees, maintenance and support fees and hosting fees, and we define churn as the percentage of RR that does not renew.  In fiscal 2014, our RR increased 14.4% over last year and the percentage of our total revenues that were RR were over 90% in fiscal 2014 and 2013.   

 

·

Develop and deploy innovative new solutions.  We have resources assigned to each of our core products that continue to research and develop new value-added features and functionality for our existing products.  The introduction of new solutions, upgrades to existing products, and new feature sets are all designed to grow our average revenue per dealer (“ARPD”), an important measure for a subscription-based business, and the increase in our customer base serves to quickly compound the benefits of an increased ARPD.  In fiscal 2014, we released a number of new features, upgrades and products including the following:

Web Platform

o

We released a completely redesigned website administration panel that is tablet-friendly, presents retailers with a clear view of the most important website value metrics, and introduces a wide array of updated tools to reduce the time and effort required to update inventory and website content. 

o

We also worked with an independent national Search Engine Optimization (“SEO”) firm to develop and implement enhanced strategies to further optimize our entire website platform, utilizing new emerging technologies, ensuring our web platform delivers the best out of the box organic search performance.

o

We developed new supplier integrations to enable retailers to present expanded real-time pricing to website shoppers, as well as seamlessly forward orders to suppliers for drop-shipment.

o

We integrated an all new search technology that significantly reduces the time to return shopping search results, while also introducing new search capabilities to enable customers to easily filter available products by key attributes. 

o

We designed and released Wheel Studio, a website visualizer that enables consumers to view available wheels on their unique vehicle in a highly dynamic and cohesive presentation on desktop, tablet, and mobile. 

eCatalog

o

We developed and released a new DaaS API suite that empowers customers to build proprietary websites and applications directly on top of our market-leading PG & A catalog information.  The API suite includes robust fitment search capabilities, image edge caching, and more, across all major power sports PG & A manufacturers.

6


 

o

We launched a new version of PartSmart Data Manager, which includes automatic diagram hotspotting that finds and links diagram callouts to associated items in the parts list; enhanced part, assembly and attachment search utilities; as well as enhanced data import features. 

o

We released an update for PartSmart, which expands the scalability and international localization capabilities, as well as introduces the ability to automatically receive parts catalog pricing updates via the internet.

o

We released a number of updates to our AccessorySmart product, introducing the ability to brand customer pick lists, view key unit technical specifications, integrate with ADP Lightspeed’s EVO business management system, and more.

o

We released updated tools for our AccessoryStream product including a new SEO control designed to optimize product presentation for search engines, as well as a new pricing import utility.

·

Differentiate our content.  We believe we have the largest library of replacement part, major unit, and PG&A content in the vertical markets we serve.  During fiscal 2014, we added 25 new accessory and 6 OEM parts catalogs to our library.  However, simply offering the largest content library in the markets we serve is not sufficient to drive the long-term revenue growth we desire.   We strive to deliver more value to our customers through enrichment of our content. Content enrichment can take several forms, including the incorporation of user reviews and feedback into our existing content, further enhancing content provided to us by our OEM customers, and creating new forms of content that further our customers’ ability to efficiently service and sell more whole goods and PG&A.  During fiscal 2014, our enrichment activities included the introduction of color parts photography to certain OEM catalogs, as well as the introduction of key unit specifications, including fluid type and capacity requirements, to our PG&A content.  We have also continued integrating analytic tools into several of our products, offering value-added feedback to our customers and channel partners to help them “Sell More Stuff!”  

·

Enter new markets.  ARI currently maintains a significant share of the OPE and appliances markets.  Accordingly, we anticipate low single-digit growth in these markets. 

o

Our acquisition of the Retail Services Division of Fifty Below Sales and Marketing, Inc. (“50 Below”) more than doubled our website business, providing ARI entrance into two new potentially high-growth markets – Automotive Tire & Wheel (“ATW”) and Home Medical Equipment (“HME”).  The acquisition also catapulted the Company into one of the leaders in the power sports industry.  As we continue to increase our share in our current markets, leveraging our technology in new and underserved markets will be important to maintaining substantial organic growth rates.  ARI currently has more than 2,000 dealer websites in the ATW market.  We estimate that the total market approximates 18,000 dealers and further, the broader automotive aftermarket comprises nearly 80,000 dealers, more than all of our other markets combined.  We intend to continue to invest heavily in this market, including seeking opportunities to leverage our products and services in the broader automotive aftermarket.  50 Below was one of the first website providers to service the HME market.  We estimate that this market comprises nearly 25,000 dealers, and believe the market to be in its infancy with respect to eCommerce.  We recently invested in dedicated resources designed to expedite our growth in this market.

 

o

Ready2Ride, Incorporated (“Ready2Ride”), which we acquired in August 2012, was the first to market with electronic aftermarket fitment data for the power sports industry. We estimate that the availability of this data almost doubles the size of our addressable market in the power sports industry.  In February 2013, we launched our new AccessorySmartTM product.  AccessorySmart is the only aftermarket PG&A lookup solution of its kind, providing access to more than 500,000 SKUs from more than 1,400 aftermarket manufacturers.  AccessorySmart provides parts and service counter personnel a one-stop resource to look up products, cost and availability for all of the leading aftermarket PG&A distributors.  AccessorySmart significantly decreases the time it takes to look up PG&A information and availability, allowing dealers to service and sell more customers on a given day.  We plan to leverage our aftermarket publishing experience and product capabilities in our other vertical markets where the market will support it.

·

Expand geographically.  Although we maintain relationships with dealers throughout the world, we have low penetration into international markets.  Growing our international business will require us to secure and publish electronic content from OEMs outside the U.S. and make changes to our existing products that will allow us to rapidly deploy these products in a scalable and efficient manner and without the need to have “boots on the ground” in those countries.   To this end we have a business development resource solely dedicated to obtaining new international content and to date, we have added 10 new catalog content offerings in the international OPE market and begun to establish relationships with OEMs in China and Europe. Also, we have upgraded our product roadmaps to allow us to rapidly deploy our products in these markets as discussed above.

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Nurture and retain existing customers through world-class customer service and value-added product feature updates.

 

In order to achieve sustained double-digit organic growth, we not only need to execute the new growth strategies described above, we must also retain our existing customers.  In a SaaS business, the cost to retain an existing customer is much less than the cost to acquire a new customer.  Accordingly, customer churn is one of the most important metrics we track and manage.  We experienced marked improvements in our churn rates the past several years as a result of strategic actions taken by the Company, all of which are designed to enhance the “stickiness” of our product within our customers’ operations.  We have reduced the rate of customer churn in each of the last four fiscal years. In fiscal 2014, customer churn improved to 12.6% from 12.8% in fiscal 2013.  We will continue to leverage our relationships with existing customers and closely monitor and manage the level of customer churn.

 

Lead the market with open integration to related platforms. 

 

One of our strategic advantages is our focus on integrating our solutions with dealer business management systems (“DMS”) in order to pass key information, including customer and transactional data, between our solutions and the DMS, saving our customers valuable time and eliminating redundant data entry.  In fiscal 2014 we furthered this goal by introducing a new integration with the ADP Lightspeed EVO DMS. We currently have integration capabilities with over 90 DMSs (we refer to these relationships as “Compass Partners”) and we continue to seek other strategic alliances that can be integrated with our product and service offerings.

 

During fiscal 2014, we also completed new supplier integrations that drive the display of real-time pricing from suppliers directly to website customers, as well as introduced new functionality to support order forwarding to suppliers for drop shipment to customers.  To further enhance our forward open integration capabilities, we also developed a new universal API for adding and maintaining unit inventory on our website platform, which will enable us to quickly connect third party systems and software to automate changes in unit inventory disposition. 

Successfully execute acquisitions that align with our core strategy

Since 1995 we have had a formal corporate development program aimed at identifying, evaluating and closing acquisitions that align with our strategy. Since the program’s inception until the end of fiscal 2014, we closed thirteen acquisitions, and we completed an additional acquisition on September 30, 2014.  A summary of some of our most recent acquisitions is as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition

 

Date

 

Strategy

OC-Net, Inc.

 

January 2007

 

New website platform

Info Access

 

July 2008

 

Market-leading entrance into appliance market

Channel Blade Technologies

 

April 2009

 

Market-leading entrance into marine and RV markets

 

 

 

 

New lead management product, Footsteps™

Ready2Ride, Inc.

 

August 2012

 

First of its kind aftermarket fitment data for the powersports industry

50 Below Sales & Marketing, Inc.

 

November 2012

 

A market leader in the powersports industry

(Retail Division)

 

 

 

Entrance into ATW and DME industries

 

 

 

 

New award-winning website platform

DUO Web Solutions

 

November 2013

 

A leading provider of social media and online marketing

 

 

 

 

 

services in the powersports industry

Tire Company Solutions, LLC

 

September 2014

 

Leading provider of website software and marketing services

 

 

 

 

 

designed exclusively for the automotive tire and wheel vertical

 

All of the acquisitions completed prior to the end of fiscal 2014 have been integrated into our operations.  Our two fiscal 2013 acquisitions, Ready2Ride and 50 Below, are discussed in detail below and our September 2014 acquisition of Tire Company Solutions, LLC (“TCS”) is discussed in Note 15 Subsequent Events in our consolidated financial statements.

 

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Our Competitive Strengths

Market Leader in Core Verticals

We believe that we are one of the leaders in each of our core vertical markets and also believe we are the market leader in the OPE, marine, and appliance markets.  More than 22,000 equipment dealers, 195 distributors and 1,500 manufacturers worldwide leverage our web and eCatalog platforms, which allow us to cost-effectively leverage our published catalog content into a large and diversified customer base and to launch new product enhancements and technology-enabled solutions to this customer base.

Breadth and Depth of Published Content

The breadth and depth of our catalog content, as well as our ability to enhance and efficiently publish manufacturers’ PG&A data as it becomes available, provides ARI with a critical competitive advantage and represents a high barrier to entry for potential new competitors.  Our eCatalog content enables multi-line dealers to easily access catalog content for multiple manufacturers using a single software platform.  This advantage, which saves our customers significant time, provides "stickiness" to our catalog customer base that allows us to efficiently and cost effectively nurture our existing customers while devoting resources to develop new products and services, enabling us to grow our overall customer base as well as ARPD.

Recurring Revenue Model

During fiscal 2014,  approximately 94% of our revenue was subscription-based and RR.  The majority of our customers are on contracts of twelve months or longer, and these contracts typically auto-renew for additional twelve month terms.  This provides us with advanced visibility into our future revenues and opportunities to sell additional services to our customers. Our RR model also emphasizes the importance of maintaining a low rate of product churn, one of the key financial drivers of any SaaS business.  We closely monitor product churn and the reasons we may lose customers so that we can take action on those reasons that are within our control in order to reduce churn rates in the future. 

Our RR model, when combined with low rates of product churn, significantly reduces the cost to maintain and nurture our customer base.  This in turn frees up resources to enhance our existing products and work toward new revenue-generating product innovations.  Additionally, a substantial portion of our eCatalog business is focused on our customers’ service and repair operations.  This allows our revenues to remain strong even in a down economy, as consumers tend to repair their equipment rather than buy new equipment, during challenging economic times.

Suite of Products Covers Entire Sales and Service Cycle

Our suite of dealer products and services and eCommerce capabilities enhance our customers' front office operations by covering the entire sales cycle, from lead generation and lead management to sales of PG&A to the consumer, both in-store and online.   Our eCatalog products allow dealers to efficiently service and repair equipment.

We believe that our competitive advantages will enable us to compete effectively and sustainably in our core markets, although given the current pace of technological change, it is possible that as yet unidentified competitors could emerge, existing competitors could merge and/or obtain additional capital, thereby making them more formidable, or new technologies could come on-stream and potentially threaten our position.

 

Our Markets and the Challenges We Face

Competition for our products and services varies by product and by vertical market. We believe that no single competitor today competes with us on every product and service in each of our industry verticals. In eCatalogs, we compete primarily with Snap-on Business Solutions, which designs and delivers eCatalogs, accessory sales tools, and manufacturer network development services, primarily to the automotive, powersports and OPE markets. In addition, there are a variety of smaller companies focused on one or two specific industries.

In lead management, websites and eCommerce, our primary competitor is PowerSports Network, owned by Dominion Enterprises.  We also compete with ADP in the powersports, marine and RV markets, and with Net Driven in the ATW market. Competition for our website development services also comes from in-house information technology groups that may prefer to build their own web-based proprietary systems, rather than use our proven industry solutions. There are also large, general market eCommerce companies, such as IBM, which offer products and services that could address some of our customers’ needs. These general eCommerce companies do not typically compete with us directly, but they could decide to do so in the future.  We believe we maintain a competitive advantage in our core vertical markets given the breadth and integration of our published catalog content into our lead management and website products.

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Several of the markets we serve, including powersports, marine, and RV, are closely aligned with the state of the economy, given the "luxury" nature of the products in those verticals.  Our product churn rates have improved in these markets the past several fiscal years.  However, future economic downturns could have a significant impact on our business as a downturn could lead to an increase in product churn in these markets due to manufacturer bankruptcies, dealer closures, and extreme cost reduction measures by our dealers.  It is also important to note that the effects of a difficult economic environment may be somewhat softened, relative to other product and service providers to the markets, by the consumers' willingness in a down economy to repair existing equipment rather than purchase new equipment, which serves to amplify the importance of our published parts content provided to customers via our catalog parts lookup products and our website products.

 

Intellectual Property

We rely on various intellectual property laws in the United States and other jurisdictions as well as confidentiality procedures and contractual provisions to protect our proprietary technology and our brand. We also enter into confidentiality and proprietary rights agreements with our employees, consultants and other third parties and control access to software, documentation and other proprietary information.  We have two registered trademarks in the U.S. and elsewhere: PartSmart® and WebsiteSmart Pro®.  We also use numerous unregistered trademarks.

 

Employees

As of July 31, 2014, we had 248 full time equivalent employees.  Of these, 106 are involved in customer operations and support, 90 are in sales and marketing, 35 are engaged in maintaining or developing software and providing software customization services and 17 are involved in general and administration functions.  None of these employees is represented by a union.    

 

Fiscal Year

ARI’s fiscal year ends on July 31st.  Any references throughout this document to “2014” or “fiscal 2014” and “2013” or “fiscal 2013” refer to the fiscal years ended July 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively. 

 

Executive Officers of the Registrant

The table below sets forth the names of ARI’s executive team as of October 20, 2014.  The executives serve at the discretion of the Board of Directors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name

 

Age

 

Capacity Served

Roy W. Olivier

 

55

 

President, Chief Executive Officer and Director

William A. Nurthen

 

41

 

Vice President of Finance, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and Treasurer

Marvin A. Berg

 

39

 

Vice President, Operations

Robert A. Ostermann

 

35

 

Chief Technology Officer

Bradley J. Smith

 

32

 

Vice President, Product Management

Robert A. Jones

 

43

 

Vice President, Sales

 

Roy W. Olivier

Mr. Olivier was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company in May 2008, after having served in the capacity of Vice President of Global Sales and Marketing of the Company since September 2006.  Prior to joining ARI in 2006, Mr. Olivier was a consultant to start-up, small and medium-sized businesses. Prior to that, he was Vice President of Sales and Marketing for ProQuest Media Solutions, a business he founded in 1993 and sold to ProQuest in 2000. Before that, Mr. Olivier held various sales and marketing executive and managerial positions with several other companies in the telecommunications and computer industries, including Multicom Publishing Inc., Tandy Corporation, BusinessLand and PacTel. 

 

William A. Nurthen

Mr. Nurthen was appointed Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer of ARI in November 2013, when he joined the Company.  Mr. Nurthen also serves as Treasurer and Corporate Secretary.  Prior to joining ARI, Mr. Nurthen served as CFO of Cabrera Capital Markets, LLC, an investment banking firm from 2011-2013.  Prior to that, he served in a variety of high-level financial leadership positions including CFO of bioLytical Laboratories from 2008-2011.  From 1999 to 2007, Mr. Nurthen served in various financial roles at Inforte Corp., a NASDAQ company, including Vice President of Finance and eventually CFO.    From 1997 to 1999, Mr. Nurthen worked in various financial operations roles at Platinum Technology International, Inc., a software and consulting

10


 

company. Mr. Nurthen earned his B.A. from The University of Notre Dame in 1995 and his MBA from The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2002. 

 

Marvin A. Berg

Mr. Berg was appointed Vice President of Operations in April 2012, leading the Company’s customer support, retention and fulfillment operations, and was named an executive officer in August 2012. Prior to this, Mr. Berg served as Director of Planning & Operations since August 2011 and Director of Finance since joining the Company in March 2010.  Prior to joining ARI, Mr. Berg served in various financial positions for Time Warner Cable, Inc. and Norlight Telecommunications, both located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Mr. Berg was also a successful business owner/operator in Milwaukee, WI from 2001 to 2005 and was a licensed stock broker from 1997 to 2000. Mr. Berg earned a B.A. in Finance from Michigan State University.

 

Robert A. Ostermann

Mr. Ostermann was appointed Chief Technology Officer of ARI in August 2012, after having served as Executive Director of Technology since November 2011 and prior to that Director of Product Engineering since joining the Company in June 2008. Prior to joining ARI, Mr. Ostermann served in various technology management and development roles at Parcel Pro Inc. in Torrance, California and The California Breath Clinics in Los Angeles, California from 2003-2008. Prior to that, he was lead developer at OC-Net, Inc. in Cypress, California. Mr. Ostermann earned a B.S. in Business Administration, Computer Information Systems from California State University.

 

Bradley J. Smith

Mr. Smith was appointed Vice President of Product Management in February 2014, leading the Company’s innovative product strategy.  Prior to this, Mr. Smith served as Director of Product Management, and prior to that, served various web development positions since joining the Company in July 2007.  Prior to joining ARI, Mr. Smith served in the U.S. Army from 2000 to 2006.  Mr. Smith holds a double B.A. in Web/Technology Development and Spanish from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 2007 and an MBA from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire in 2012.

 

Robert A. Jones

Mr. Jones was appointed Vice President of Sales in August 2014, after having served as Director of Sales since November 2013, when he joined the Company.  Prior to joining ARI, Mr. Jones served as Director of Retail Sales at 50 Below Sales and Marketing, Inc. from February 2010 to November 2013.   Prior to that Mr. Jones spent 25 years in the Hospitality Industry holding various high level positions with several companies including  Buffets International and  New London Corp.

 

Available Information

You can obtain copies of our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and other filings with the SEC, and all amendments to these filings, free of charge from our investor relations website at investor.arinet.com as soon as reasonably practical following our filing of any of these reports with the SEC. You can also obtain copies free of charge by contacting us at our office address listed above.

 

Item 1A.  Risk Factors

The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones facing us. Other events that we do not currently anticipate or that we do not currently deem to be material also may affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Continued unfavorable economic conditions or reduced investments in technology spending may harm our business.

Our business depends on the overall demand for technology services spending, and on the economic health and general willingness of our current and prospective customers to make capital and expense commitments. If the conditions in the U.S. and global economic environment remain uncertain or continue to be volatile, or if they deteriorate further, our business, operating results and financial condition may be adversely affected. Our customers sell capital goods, some of which are considered “luxury” in nature, which are highly dependent on the disposable income of end consumers.  Weak or volatile economic conditions, or a reduction in consumer spending may weaken our customers’ demand for eCatalogs, websites, lead management or other technology-enabled services, or their general information technology spending, which would likely harm our business and operating results in a number of ways, including longer sales cycles, potential lower prices for our services, reduced sales, and increased churn.

11


 

We may become liable to our customers and lose customers if we have defects or disruptions in our service or if we provide poor service.

Because we deliver some of our technology as a service, errors or defects in the software applications underlying our services, or a failure of our hosting infrastructure, may make our services, in particular our eCommerce services, unavailable to our customers. Since our customers use our eCommerce services to facilitate their sales, any errors, defects, disruptions in service or other performance problems with our services, whether in connection with the day-to-day operation of our services, upgrades or otherwise, could damage our customers’ businesses.

Despite the implementation of security measures, the core of our network infrastructure is vulnerable to unauthorized access, computer viruses, equipment failure and other disruptive problems, including the following: 

·

we and our users may experience interruptions in service as a result of the accidental or intentional actions of Internet users, current and former employees or others;

·

unauthorized access may jeopardize the security of confidential information stored in our computer systems and our customers’ computer systems, which may result in liability to our customers and also may deter potential customers;

·

we may face liability for transmitting to third parties viruses that damage or impair their access to computer networks, programs, data or information;

·

there may be a systemic failure of Internet communications, leading to claims associated with the general unavailability of some of our products; or

·

eliminating computer viruses and alleviating other security or technical problems may require interruptions, delays or cessation of service to our customers.

If we have any errors, defects, disruptions in service or other performance problems with our services, customers could elect not to renew, or delay or withhold payment to us, we could lose future sales or customers may make claims against us, which could result in an increase in our provision for doubtful accounts, an increase in collection cycles for accounts receivable or litigation costs.

We may be exposed to risks and costs associated with protecting the integrity and security of our customers’ information.

A significant number of customer make purchases from us using credit cards.  In order for our business to function successfully, we and other market participants must be able to handle and transmit confidential information, including credit card information, securely. We are not fully compliant with Payment Card Industry, or PCI, Data Security Standards and there can be no assurance that in the future we will be able to operate our facilities and our customer service and sales operations in accordance with PCI or other industry recommended practices. We intend to obtain compliance with PCI Data Security Standards and will incur additional expenses to attain and maintain PCI compliance.

Further, there is increased litigation over personally identifiable information and we may be subject to one or more claims or lawsuits related to intentional or unintentional exposure of our customer’s personally identifiable information. Even if we are compliant with such standards, we still may not be able to prevent security breaches involving customer transaction data. Any breach could cause consumers to lose confidence in the security of our website and choose not to purchase from us. If a computer hacker or other criminal is able to circumvent our security measures, he or she could destroy or steal valuable information or disrupt our operations. Any security breach could expose us to risks of data loss, fines, litigation and liability and could seriously disrupt our operations and harm our reputation, any of which could adversely affect our business.

In addition, states and the federal government have enacted additional laws and regulations to protect consumers against identity theft, including laws governing treatment of personally identifiable information. We collect and store personal information from consumers in the course of doing business. These laws have increased the costs of doing business and, if we fail to implement appropriate safeguards or we fail to detect and provide prompt notice of unauthorized access as required by some of these laws, we could be subject to potential claims for damages and other remedies. If we were required to pay any significant amounts in satisfaction of claims under these laws, or if we were forced to cease our business operations for any length of time as a result of our inability to comply fully with any such law, our business, operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected.

12


 

Our core markets and verticals are competitive, and if we do not compete effectively, our operating results may be harmed.

The markets for eCatalogs, websites, lead management and other technology-enabled services targeted at our vertical markets are competitive, and the eCommerce area, specifically, is rapidly changing with relatively low barriers to entry. With the introduction of new technologies and market entrants, we expect competition to remain intense. In addition, increased competition generally could result in reduced sales, reduced margin or the failure of our services to achieve or maintain more widespread market acceptance. Competition in our market is based principally upon service breadth and functionality; service performance, security and reliability; ability to tailor and customize services for a specific company, vertical market or industry; ease of use of the service; speed and ease of deployment, integration and configuration; total cost of ownership, including price and implementation and support costs; professional services implementation; strength of customer relationships; and financial resources of the vendor. To compete effectively, we also must be able to more frequently update our services to meet market demand.

Our principal competitors include Snap-on Business Solutions and Powersports Network, owned by Dominion Enterprises. Some of our actual and potential competitors enjoy competitive advantages over us, such as greater name recognition within our target vertical markets, larger marketing budgets, as well as substantially greater financial, technical and other resources. If we are not able to compete effectively, our operating results will be harmed.

The impact of negative factors on the business may not be immediately reflected in our financial results.

Because we recognize subscription revenue over the term of the applicable agreement, non-renewal of subscriptions or reductions in new service agreements may not be reflected immediately in our operating results. The majority of our revenue in any given period is attributable to service agreements entered into during previous periods. A decline in new or renewed service agreements in any one period will not be fully reflected in our revenue in that period but will harm our revenue in future periods. As a result, the effect of significant downturns in sales and market acceptance of our services in a particular period may not be fully reflected in our operating results until future periods. Our subscription model also makes it difficult for us to rapidly increase our revenue through additional sales in any period, because revenue from new customers must be recognized over the applicable subscription term.

Our operating results may fluctuate from quarter to quarter.

We expect that a portion of our revenue in the future will be derived from non-recurring fee income, which consists primarily of revenues from professional services such as software customization and training, software sales and one-time network installation fees.  The timing of receipt of this revenue is dependent upon several factors that we cannot predict.  These factors include:

·

the time required to close large license fee and development agreements, which can be delayed due to customer requirements and decision-making processes;

·

the seasonality of certain sectors of the markets in which we operate;

·

delays in the introduction of new products or services and their acceptance by customers; and

·

delays in delivering customized software to our customers.

 

Our costs are not entirely predictable and may vary from quarter-to-quarter due to acquisitions or non-recurring expenditures.  Cash flows may also vary from quarter to quarter, depending on the timing of disbursements and customer payments. These fluctuations may make period-to-period comparisons of our results of operations more complex.

Changes in financial accounting standards or practices may cause adverse, unexpected financial reporting fluctuations and harm our operating results.

A change in accounting standards or practices could harm our operating results and may even affect our reporting of transactions completed before the change is effective. New accounting pronouncements and varying interpretations of accounting pronouncements have occurred and may occur in the future. Changes to existing rules or the questioning of current practices may harm our operating results or the way we conduct our business and may increase our compliance costs.

Our business could suffer if we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights or become liable for infringing the intellectual property rights of others.

We regard our trademarks, proprietary technology and similar intellectual property as critical to our success, and we rely upon trademark law, trade secret protection, and confidentiality and license agreements with our employees, strategic partners, and others to protect our proprietary rights, but these measures can have only limited effectiveness. Prevalent use of the Internet has also increased the ease with which third parties can distribute our intellectual property without our authorization.

13


 

We intend to pursue the registration of our material trademarks as necessary. We may not be entitled to the benefits of any such registration until such registration takes effect. In addition, effective protection may not be available in every country in which our products are available. Further, we may be subject to claims in the ordinary course of our business, including claims of alleged infringement of the trademarks, copyrights and other intellectual property rights of third parties by us and our licensees.

Other parties may assert claims of infringement of intellectual property or other proprietary rights against us. These claims, even if without merit, could require us to expend significant financial and managerial resources. Furthermore, if claims like this were successful, we might be required to change our trademarks, alter our content, products or services, or pay financial damages, any of which could substantially increase our operating expenses. We also may be required to obtain licenses from others to refine, develop, market and deliver new services. We may be unable to obtain any needed license on commercially reasonable terms or at all, and rights granted under any licenses may not be valid and enforceable. In the future we could be subject to legal proceedings and claims from time to time in the ordinary course of our business, including claims of alleged infringement of trademarks and other intellectual property rights of third parties by us and our licensees. Any such claims could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.

We are dependent on our management and employees.

We are dependent on the services of our executive officers and other key employees. There can be no assurance, however, that we can obtain executives of comparable expertise and commitment in the event of death, disability, or voluntary departure of one of our executive officers or other key employees, or that our business would not suffer material adverse effects as the result of the death, disability, or voluntary departure.  Further, the loss of the services of any one or more of these employees could have an adverse effect on our business. In addition, we will also need to attract and retain other highly skilled technical and managerial personnel for whom competition is intense. If we are unable to do so, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

Our common stock has had limited trading.

Trading in our common stock has historically been thin. Because of the thinness of the market for our stock, the price of our common stock may be subject to manipulation.  This limited trading may adversely affect the liquidity of our common stock, not only in terms of the number of shares that can be bought and sold at a given price, but also through delays in the timing of transactions and reduction in security analysts’ and the media’s coverage of us. As a result, there could be a larger spread between the bid and the ask prices of our common stock and an investor may not be able to sell shares of our common stock when or at prices they desire.

We may not be able to identify, acquire and successfully integrate acquisitions.

A key component of our growth strategy has been and will continue to be acquisitions and other business development opportunities that solidify or accelerate our market position in our core offerings and vertical markets.  The successful implementation of this strategy depends upon our ability to identify suitable acquisition candidates, acquire such businesses on acceptable terms, finance the acquisitions and integrate their operations successfully into ARI. There can be no assurance that such candidates will be available or, if such candidates are available, that the price will be attractive or that we will be able to identify, acquire, finance or integrate such businesses successfully. In addition, in pursuing such acquisition opportunities, we may compete with other entities with similar growth strategies; these competitors may be larger and have greater financial and other resources than ARI. Competition for these acquisition targets could also result in increased prices of acquisition targets and/or a diminished pool of companies available for acquisition.

The successful integration of these acquisitions also may involve a number of additional risks, including: (i) the inability to retain the clients of the acquired business; (ii) the lingering effects of poor client relations or service performance by the acquired business, which also may taint our existing business; (iii) the inability to retain the desirable management, key personnel and other employees of the acquired business; (iv) the inability to fully realize the desired efficiencies and economies of scale; (v) the inability to establish, implement or police ARI’s existing standards, controls, procedures and policies in the acquired business; (vi) diversion of management attention; and (vii) exposure to client, employee and other legal claims for activities of the acquired business prior to acquisition. In addition, any acquired business could perform significantly worse than expected.

The inability to identify, acquire, finance and successfully integrate acquisitions could have a material adverse effect on ARI or its estimated or desired business, income, growth or other condition and results.

14


 

Future acquisitions, financing arrangements or exercise of outstanding options and warrants may result in dilution to existing shareholders.

The timing, size and success of acquisition efforts and any capital commitments cannot be readily predicted. Future acquisitions or investments may be financed by issuing shares of common stock, cash, or a combination thereof.  To the extent our common stock is used for all or a portion of the consideration to be paid for future acquisitions or investments, shareholders’ ownership will be diluted.

We face risks with our international strategy.

Our business strategy includes increasing our presence in the non-U.S. markets.  This strategy presents a number of special risks, including:

·

managing more geographically diverse operations;

·

dealing with currency fluctuations;

·

the increased costs of operation;

·

only having a small number of employees in these markets;

·

our dependence on value-added resellers and contractors to sell and service our products;

·

a much smaller and more concentrated current customer base; and

·

the assumption that U.S. international policy will remain favorable towards the countries in which we sell our products and services.

Our historical losses have resulted in accumulated deficits on the consolidated balance sheet.

While we have been profitable in recent years, we have experienced net losses in numerous fiscal years since our organization in 1981, including fiscal 2014.  These net losses have resulted in an accumulated deficit of $88,864,000 at July 31, 2014.  We may not be able to attain or increase profitability in the future.  As a result of these historical losses, our financial position has been weakened, and our ability to finance our growth may be constrained. 

We will require a significant amount of cash to service our indebtedness.  Our ability to generate cash depends on certain factors beyond our control.

Our ability to make principal and interest payments on our indebtedness and to fund planned capital expenditures and product development efforts will depend on our ability to generate cash in the future. Our future operating performance and financial results will be subject, in part, to factors beyond our control, including dealer bankruptcies in the vertical markets we serve, and general economic, financial and business conditions. We cannot assure that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or that future financing facilities will be available to us in an amount sufficient to enable us to pay our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs.

If we are unable to generate sufficient cash flow to service our debt, we may be required to:

·

refinance all or a portion of our debt or obtain additional financing, neither of which can be assured and may be at terms that are less favorable than our current financing arrangements;

·

sell some of our assets or operations;

·

reduce or delay capital expenditures, research and development efforts and acquisitions; or

·

revise or delay our strategic plans.

If we are required to take any of these actions, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, we cannot assure that we would be able to take any of these actions, that these actions would enable us to continue to satisfy our capital requirements or that these actions would be permitted under the terms of our various debt instruments.

15


 

Item 2.  Properties

The table below summarizes ARI’s current facilities.  Management believes that the Company’s current facilities are suitable and sufficient to support present operations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Square

 

Lease

 

 

 

Description of Use

 

Location

 

Footage

 

Expiration

 

Country

 

Corporate headquarters; outdoor power equipment, marine and recreational vehicle

 

Milwaukee, WI

 

16,300 

 

July 2021

 

United States

 

Powersports, automotive tire and wheel and durable medical equipment sales and support

 

Duluth, MN

 

25,500 

 

January 2019

 

United States

 

Software development

 

Cypress, CA

 

6,000 

 

July 2015

 

United States

 

Aftermarket publishing

 

Floyds Knobs, IN

 

2,200 

 

April 2017

 

United States

 

Automotive tire and wheel sales and support

 

Cookeville, TN

 

14,000 

 

November 2018

 

United States

 

Automotive tire and wheel sales and support

 

Salt Lake City, UT

 

1,960 

 

April 2016

 

United States

 

European sales and support

 

Leiden, The Netherlands

 

2,200 

 

April 2015

 

Netherlands

 

 

Item 3.  Legal Proceedings

None.

 

Item 4.  Mine Safety Disclosures

Not Applicable.

PART II

Item 5.  Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

ARI’s common stock is currently traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “ARIS”.  Prior to December 9, 2013, ARI’s common stock was quoted on the OTCQB.  The following table sets forth the high and low sales price for the periods indicated. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter Ended:

 

High

 

Low

10/31/2012

 

$

1.30 

 

$

0.90 

1/31/2013

 

$

1.81 

 

$

1.12 

4/30/2013

 

$

2.70 

 

$

1.60 

7/31/2013

 

$

3.05 

 

$

2.45 

10/31/2013

 

$

3.40 

 

$

2.70 

1/31/2014

 

$

3.51 

 

$

2.92 

4/30/2014

 

$

3.45 

 

$

2.33 

7/31/2014

 

$

3.22 

 

$

2.53 

 

As of October 20, 2014, there were approximately 1,018 holders of record of ARI common stock.  We have not paid cash dividends to date and have no current intention to pay cash dividends.  Our ability to make distributions to our shareholders, including cash dividends, is also restricted under the terms of our credit facilities.

During fiscal 2014, the Company did not repurchase any of its equity securities.

16


 

Item 6.  Selected Financial Data

Not Applicable.

 

Item 7.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion of our results of operations and financial condition should be read together with our audited consolidated financial statements for fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013, including the notes thereto, which appear elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.  This discussion contains forward-looking statements, which as previously identified are subject to the safe harbors created under the Securities Act and Exchange Act.

Overview

Fiscal 2014 was a record year for ARI, with revenues of over $33 million.  Total revenue increased 9.7% or $2,917,000 during fiscal 2014, over the same period last year.  Recurring revenue increased 14.4% in fiscal 2014, compared to the same period last year, and constituted over 90% of our total revenue for fiscal 2014. The growth in revenue is largely attributable to revenue from the 50 Below acquisition in November 2012.    

Our operating income increased 276.2% or $558,000 from a loss of $202,000 during fiscal 2013 to income of $356,000 fiscal 2014.  Operating expenses increased 11.1% or $2,617,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to the same period last year, primarily due to the additional costs of the 50 Below operation, an increase in our sales and marketing resources, and termination benefits incurred in connection with a workforce reduction in January 2014. 

During January 2014, the Company implemented a 14% reduction in workforce, primarily in the catalog conversion and website implementation and support areas, as a result of consolidating operations and other operational efficiencies achieved as we have continued to integrate the 50 Below operation, thereby eliminating duplicate efforts.  The Company expensed approximately $300,000 fiscal 2014 in severance and related costs as a result of this workforce reduction.

The Company had a net loss of $102,000 or $0.01 per share during fiscal 2014, compared to a net loss of $753,000 or $0.08 per share during fiscal 2013.  The decrease in net loss is primarily due to (i) the increase in operating income; (ii) a loss on debt extinguishment and higher interest expense in fiscal 2013; offset in part by (iii) an increase in income tax expense, primarily as a result of a benefit related to a change in valuation allowance against deferred tax assets recorded in fiscal 2013.

Cash flow from operations was $2,383,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to $2,404,000 during fiscal 2013.  We expect an increase in cash from operations in fiscal 2015 due to the cost savings from the operational efficiency improvements made in the second quarter of fiscal 2014 and an increase in cash receipts as a result of RR growth. 

Subsequent Event

On September 30, 2014, we completed the acquisition of TCS, a leading provider of software, websites and marketing services designed exclusively for the automotive tire and wheel vertical.  We believe the TCS business will allow us to consolidate our leadership position and provide additional solution offerings in the automotive tire and wheel industry.  See Note 15 Subsequent Events for a description of the TCS acquisition and the related transactions.

Revenue

The following table summarizes our revenue by product and by RR and non-recurring revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% of

 

 

 

 

% of

 

 

 

2014

 

Total

 

2013

 

Total

 

% Change

Website

$

16,826 

 

51.0 

%

 

$

13,140 

 

43.7 

%

 

28.1 

%

Catalog

 

14,042 

 

42.5 

%

 

 

13,882 

 

46.1 

%

 

1.2 

%

Lead management

 

969 

 

2.9 

%

 

 

1,039 

 

3.5 

%

 

(6.7)

%

Digital marketing

 

449 

 

1.4 

%

 

 

856 

 

2.8 

%

 

(47.5)

%

Other

 

733 

 

2.2 

%

 

 

1,185 

 

3.9 

%

 

(38.1)

%

Total Revenue

$

33,019 

 

100.0 

%

 

$

30,102 

 

100.0 

%

 

9.7 

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recurring revenue

 

30,896 

 

93.6 

 

 

 

27,016 

 

89.7 

 

 

14.4 

%

Non-recurring revenue

 

2,123 

 

6.4 

 

 

 

3,086 

 

10.3 

 

 

(31.2)

%

Total Revenue

$

33,019 

 

100.0 

%

 

$

30,102 

 

100.0 

%

 

9.7 

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total revenue increased 9.7% or $2,917,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to the same period last year.  Recurring revenue increased 14.4% or $3,880,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013.  RR represented 93.6% of total revenues during fiscal 2014 versus 89.7% during fiscal 2013. 

17


 

Website Revenue

 

Our Website solutions generate revenue from one-time set-up and customization fees to develop new dealer websites, which is recognized ratably over the term of the contract, monthly recurring subscription fees and variable transaction fees.  Our website solutions are typically sold as one year, renewable contracts with monthly payment terms.  We estimate that we currently host and maintain more than 6,100 websites for dealers in all of our vertical markets.  Websites have become ARI’s largest source of revenue and accounted for 51% of total revenue during fiscal 2014.  Website revenue increased 28.1% to $16,826,000 in fiscal 2014, compared to $13,140,000 during fiscal 2013. The growth in Website revenue was largely the result of our acquisition of 50 Below in November 2012.  Since the acquisition, we have integrated our sales, support and implementation teams related to our website products.  As part of the 50 Below acquisition, the Company assumed a significant recurring revenue service obligation and has had a high success rate in renewing those contracts.  We anticipate that our web platforms will continue to be the Company’s largest source of growth, much of this growth coming in the ATW and HME markets, both of which are new to ARI. 

 

eCatalog Revenue

 

Our eCatalog solutions generate revenue from renewable subscription fees for our software, data content, software maintenance and support fees and software customization fees.   eCatalog is our second largest source of RR, representing 42.5% of total revenue during fiscal 2014.  eCatalog revenue increased 1.2% or $160,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013.  eCatalog revenues have historically had the Company’s lowest revenue growth rates, primarily attributable to ARI’s already strong market position.  We saw a small increase in eCatalog revenue as a result of our new AccessorySmart product, which is a fitment-powered aftermarket PG&A lookup solution and is a first-of-its-kind in the powersports industry.  The product won a “Nifty 50 Award” from Powersports Business, a leading industry trade publication, at the powersports industry’s largest trade show in February 2014.

 

Lead Management Revenue

 

Lead management revenue is primarily generated from renewable subscription fees and variable transaction fees for the use of our Footsteps™ products.  Lead management revenue decreased 6.7% to $969,000 in fiscal 2014 from $1,039,000 during fiscal 2013.  Management is currently reviewing various options with respect to the Footsteps™ product, including the possibility of including the core functionality of the product within our web platforms and expects this product to continue to be instrumental in our goal of helping our customers Sell More Stuff!TM

 

Digital Marketing Revenue

 

Revenues from our digital marketing solutions are generated from set-up fees and subscription fees for our lead generation tools through search engine optimization, social media marketing and website enhancements.  We derived approximately 1% of our revenues from digital marketing services during fiscal 2014.  Digital marketing services is a relatively new service offering by ARI and in the third quarter of fiscal 2014, we went to market with a more robust offering in the space, which included RR offerings, as a result of our integration of the DUO business we acquired in November 2013.  Digital marketing revenue decreased 47.5% from $856,000 during fiscal 2013 to $449,000 during fiscal 2014.  The decline in digital marketing revenues was primarily driven by a change in business model for our lead generation service.  The largest cost associated with this service is the purchase of ad words from Internet search providers such as Google.  Historically, the revenues recognized on this service included the cost associated with the ad word spend.  These costs were then “passed through” directly to the Internet search provider.  Under this model, GAAP requires these costs to be recognized as both a revenue and a cost of sale.  Not only did this treatment have the impact of reducing gross margins as a percentage of revenue, but also provided negative float to ARI as the ad word costs were at times paid to the Internet search provider prior to receiving the funds from the customer. During the latter part of fiscal 2013, we made a change to this business model whereby the customer is now responsible for paying the cost of the ad words directly to the Internet search provider.  ARI now simply charges the customer a fee for the service provided.  This change had the impact of reducing GAAP revenues associated with this service, as discussed above.  However, the change had little or no net impact on the gross profit or net cash receipts associated with the service.

 

Other Revenue

 

We also offer a suite of complementary solutions, which include software and website customization services and hosting services.  Other revenue, which is primarily non-recurring in nature, declined 38.1% from $1,185,000 during fiscal 2013 to $733,000 during fiscal 2014.  The decline in other revenue is primarily due to a decrease in our professional services revenue as a result of our goal of focusing on RR, which generates higher gross profits.  Revenues from non-recurring professional services will fluctuate from period to period based on the timing of custom projects.

 

18


 

Recurring Revenue

 

RR is one of the most important growth drivers of our business.  Increasing the percentage of our revenues that are recurring, while at the same time reducing the rate of product churn, enhances our ability to generate profitable growth.  Our subscription-based SaaS and DaaS products generate higher margins than our non-recurring products and services, and the incremental cost of selling these products to new dealers (we refer to these as new “logos”) is relatively low.  Reducing the rate of our product churn, which is the percentage of RR that does not renew, helps drive organic growth as it allows for a greater percentage of our new logos to be incremental to the top line (versus making up for lost logos) and also increases the base upon which we can apply price increases and sell additional products and features.

 

We generate RR from each of our primary product categories from monthly license, subscription, maintenance and support fees.  RR increased 14.4% from $27,016,000 during fiscal 2013 to $30,896,000 during fiscal 2014.  The growth in RR was primarily attributable to our Website products.  We expect Website RR to continue to be our largest contributor to RR growth in fiscal 2015.

 

Non-recurring Revenue

 

Non-recurring revenue is generated from certain offerings within the Company’s digital marketing services, including its lead management tool SearchEngineSmart™, professional services related to software customization and data conversion, usage fees charged on our RR products, and other complementary products and services.  Total non-recurring revenue declined 31.2% from $3,086,000 during fiscal 2013 to $2,123,000 during fiscal 2014.     The decrease in non-recurring revenue was primarily due to the change in our lead generation business model and a decline in professional services revenue.  Our goal is to maintain non-recurring revenues of less than 10% of total revenues, as the margins on these revenues tend to be lower than our RR products.  Furthermore, these revenues must be resold each year.  We expect non-recurring revenues to be less than 10% of total revenues during fiscal 2015.

 

Cost of Revenue and Gross Margin

We classify as cost of revenue those costs directly attributable to the provision of services. These costs include (i) software amortization, which represents the periodic amortization of costs for internally developed or purchased software sold to customers; (ii) direct labor for the provision of catalog production, product implementations and professional services revenue; and (iii) other direct costs, which represent amounts paid to third party vendors for data royalties, as well as data conversion and replication fees directly attributable to the services we provide our customers.

The table below breaks out cost of revenue into each of these three categories:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% of

 

 

 

 

% of

 

 

 

 

2014

 

Revenue

 

2013

 

Revenue

 

% Change

Net revenues

$

33,019 

 

 

 

 

$

30,102 

 

 

 

 

9.7 

%

Cost of revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amortization of capitalized software costs

 

2,052 

 

6.2 

%

 

 

1,741 

 

5.8 

%

 

17.9 

%

Direct labor

 

2,151 

 

6.5 

%

 

 

2,406 

 

8.0 

%

 

(10.6)

%

Other direct costs

 

2,175 

 

6.6 

%

 

 

2,489 

 

8.3 

%

 

(12.6)

%

Total cost of revenues

 

6,378 

 

19.3 

%

 

 

6,636 

 

22.0 

%

 

(3.9)

%

Gross profit

$

26,641 

 

80.7 

%

 

$

23,466 

 

78.0 

%

 

13.5 

%

 

Gross profit was $26,641,000 or 80.7% of revenue in fiscal 2014, compared to $23,466,000 or 78.0% of revenue for the same period last year.  The gross profit margin improvement was due to several factors resulting from our strategy to focus on recurring SaaS and DaaS services, which have a much higher gross margin than our non-recurring services: (i) we made a change to our lead generation service business model, eliminating the pass-through cost of purchased ad words from search engine providers on behalf of our customers; (ii) we had a reduction in direct labor costs as a result of the decline in professional service revenue; and (iii) we had a decrease in direct labor costs associated with the reduction of workforce in January 2014.  The Company expects fluctuations in gross margin from quarter to quarter and year over year based on the mix of products sold.

 

19


 

Operating Expenses

We categorize net operating expenses as follows:

·

Sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of personnel and related costs, including commissions for our sales and marketing employees, and the cost of marketing programs and trade show attendance;

·

Customer operations and support expenses are composed of our computer hosting operations, software maintenance agreements for our core network, and personnel and related costs for operations and support employees;

·

Software development and technical support expenses are composed primarily of personnel and related costs; we capitalize certain of these costs in accordance with GAAP, which is discussed below, while the remaining costs are primarily related to technical support and research and development;

·

General and administrative expenses primarily consist of personnel and related costs for executive, finance, human resources and administrative personnel, legal and other professional fees and other corporate expenses and overhead;

·

Depreciation and amortization expenses consist of depreciation on fixed assets, which are composed of leasehold improvements and information technology assets, and the amortization of acquisition-related intangible assets. Costs associated with the amortization of software products are a component of cost of revenue;  and

·

We allocate certain shared costs among the various net operating expense classifications.  Allocated costs include facilities, insurance, and telecommunications.  These costs are generally allocated based on headcount, unless circumstances dictate otherwise.  All public company costs, including legal and accounting fees, investor relations costs, board fees and directors and officers liability insurance, remain in general and administrative.

 

The following table summarizes our unaudited operating expenses by expense category (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% of

 

 

 

 

% of

 

 

 

 

2014

 

Revenue

 

2013

 

Revenue

 

% Change

Sales and marketing

 

$

9,344 

 

28.3 

%

 

$

7,480 

 

24.8 

%

 

24.9 

%

Customer operations and support

 

 

6,645 

 

20.1 

%

 

 

5,834 

 

19.4 

%

 

13.9 

%

Software development and technical support

 

 

2,717 

 

8.2 

%

 

 

2,648 

 

8.8 

%

 

2.6 

%

General and administrative

 

 

6,222 

 

18.8 

%

 

 

6,005 

 

19.9 

%

 

3.6 

%

Depreciation and amortization (1)

 

 

1,322 

 

4.0 

%

 

 

1,281 

 

4.3 

%

 

3.2 

%

Loss on impairment of long-lived assets

 

 

35 

 

0.1 

%

 

 

420 

 

1.4 

%

 

(91.7)

%

Net operating expenses

 

$

26,285 

 

79.6 

%

 

$

23,668 

 

78.6 

%

 

11.1 

%

 

Net operating expenses increased 11.1% or $2,617,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013. The increase in net operating expenses was largely due to the costs necessary to operate the 50 Below business for a full year in fiscal 2014 versus 8 months in fiscal 2013, primarily in the sales and marketing and general and administrative categories.  During January 2014, the Company implemented a 14% reduction in workforce as a result of consolidating operations and other operational efficiencies achieved as we have continued to integrate the 50 Below operation, primarily in the catalog conversion and website implementation and support areas, thereby eliminating duplicate efforts.  The Company expensed approximately $300,000 during fiscal 2014 in severance and related costs as a result of this workforce reduction. To the extent the Company can leverage growth in its core RR products, management expects net operating expenses to decline as a percentage of total revenues, as incremental costs related to these products decrease for every dollar of new revenue.

 

Sales and Marketing

 

Sales and marketing expense increased 24.9% or $1,864,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013.  The increase was primarily a result of a full year of sales staff for the 50 Below operation and an increase in trade show attendance and variable selling expense on increased new sales.  Sales and marketing expense as a percentage of revenue increased from 24.8% of revenue in fiscal 2013 to 28.3% for the same period in fiscal 2014.  The Company has focused its resources in the sales and marketing area designed to drive revenue growth, increasing staff in both sales and marketing, and has increased involvement in trade shows and online publications.  Management expects sales and marketing expense as a percentage of revenue to fluctuate, based upon the timing of the Company’s marketing events and trade show schedule and its decision to add additional sales and marketing resources to drive organic revenue growth.

20


 

 

Customer Operations and Support

 

Customer operations and support expense increased 13.9% or $811,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to the same period last year.  Customer operations and support expense as a percentage of revenue increased from 19.4% of revenue during fiscal 2013 to 20.1%  during fiscal 2014.  The increase in customer operations and support expense is primarily related to the additional costs necessary to operate the 50 Below business for a full year. Management expects customer operations and support expenses to decline, as a percentage of total revenues, over time as we realize the cost savings related to the efficiencies implemented in the catalog conversion and customer implementation and support areas, while RR continues to grow.

 

Software Development and Technical Support

 

Our software development and technical support staff have three essential responsibilities for which the accounting treatment varies depending upon the work performed: (i) costs associated with internal software development efforts (after technological feasibility is established) are capitalized as software product costs and amortized over the estimated useful lives of the product; (ii) costs for professional services performed for customers related to software customization projects are classified as cost of revenue; and (iii) all other activities, including research and development, are considered operating expenses and included within the software development and technical support operating expense category.

The table below summarizes our internal software development and technical support costs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

% Change

Total software development and technical support costs

 

$

6,369 

 

$

6,785 

 

(6.1)

%

Less: amount capitalized as software development

 

 

(1,501)

 

 

(1,731)

 

(13.3)

%

Less: direct labor classified as cost of revenues

 

 

(2,151)

 

 

(2,406)

 

(10.6)

%

Net software development and technical support costs classified as operating expenses

 

$

2,717 

 

$

2,648 

 

2.6 

%

 

*Does not include outside vendor costs or capitalized interest costs

 

Total software development and technical support costs decreased 6.1% or $416,000 during fiscal 2014 versus fiscal 2013.  The decrease was primarily a result of the workforce reduction in January 2014.   

During fiscal 2014, we capitalized $1,501,000 of software development labor and overhead, versus $1,731,000 during the same period last year.  In addition to internal capitalized software costs, we had outsourced development costs of $284,000 during fiscal 2014 and $0 during fiscal 2013.  During fiscal 2014, we have devoted resources to several enhancements of our newly acquired website product, including integration with our lead management and lead optimization tools.  In addition to this, we added a new online application update process to PartSmart, which expands the scalability and international capabilities of the product.    During fiscal 2013, we devoted resources to upgrading the 50 Below product with new functionality and design similar to ARI’s product suite

Direct labor classified as cost of sales declined 10.6% or $255,000 during fiscal 2014 versus fiscal 2013 due to the decline in professional service revenue and the workforce reduction, which was a result of efficiencies implemented in the catalog conversion and customer implementation and support areas.

We expect fluctuations in the percentage of software development and technical support costs classified as operating expenses from period to period, based on the mix of research and prototype work versus capitalized software development and professional services activities. 

Loss on Impairment of Long Lived Assets

During fiscal 2014, we recorded a loss of $35,000 on the impairment of long-lived assets primarily as a result of the closing of the Virginia Beach office.  During fiscal 2013, we recorded a loss of $420,000 on the impairment of long-lived assets related to the development of an internal ERP system. 

 

21


 

Other Income and Expense

The table below summarizes the components of other income and expenses for fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

 

% Change

 

Interest expense

$

(286)

 

$

(626)

 

(54.3)

%

 

Loss on debt extinguishment

 

 —

 

 

(682)

 

(100.0)

%

 

Loss on change in fair value of stock warrants

 

(28)

 

 

(635)

 

(95.6)

%

 

Gain on change in fair value of contingent liabilities

 

67 

 

 

180 

 

(62.8)

%

 

Gain on change in fair value of contingent assets

 

 —

 

 

64 

 

(100.0)

%

 

Other, net

 

30 

 

 

15 

 

100.0 

%

 

Total other income (expense)

$

(217)

 

$

(1,684)

 

(87.1)

%

 

 

Interest Expense

 

Interest expense is composed of both interest paid on the Company’s debt financing arrangements and amortization of non-cash interest charges related to deferred finance costs.  Interest expense decreased 54.3% or $340,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to fiscal 2013.  The decrease in interest expense is a result of the April 2013 restructuring of debt.

 

Loss on Debt Extinguishment

 

In April, 2013, we refinanced our debt under more favorable interest and payment terms.  As a result of the early extinguishment of debt, we recorded a loss of $682,000 related to unamortized debt discount for stock issued as a cost of acquiring the debt and unamortized deferred loan fees.

 

Gain (Loss) on Change in Fair Value of Stock Warrants

 

In March 2013, we executed a private placement with certain institutional and accredited investors.  As part of the transaction, the Company issued warrants to purchase an aggregate of 1,130,667 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $2.00 per share.  The warrants contained a down-round protection feature which reduced the strike price of the warrants from $2.00 to $1.50 if there was a private placement for less than the $2.00 strike price.  This feature resulted in the warrants being treated as a derivative instrument. Accordingly, the warrants were recorded as a liability on the balance sheet at fair market value and changes in the fair market value were recorded to gain or loss on change in fair market value of stock warrants on the statement of operations. 

 

We incurred a non-cash loss of $28,000 in fiscal 2014 and $635,000 in fiscal 2013 related to the warrants, primarily as a result of changes in the market value of the Company’s common stock.  We have 214,000 warrants outstanding at July 31, 2014, which were reclassified to equity in June 2014, due to the expiration of the down-round protection feature.

 

Gain on Change in Fair Value of Contingent Liabilities

 

The Company incurred a liability as part of the consideration for the Ready2Ride acquisition in August 2012, contingent on future revenues earned related to the acquired business.  During fiscal 2013, we had a change in the estimated fair value of the contingent liabilities due to an evaluation of the estimated future revenues resulting from that operation.  The amount of this change in estimated fair value was income of $180,000, or $0.02 per basic and diluted common share.    On October 22, 2013, the Company amended the Purchase Agreement in relation to the earn-out payments resulting in three fixed payments of $125,000 and the issuance of an aggregate of 40,000 shares of common stock.  We recorded a gain on change in fair value of earn-out payable of $67,000, or $0.01 per basic and diluted common share during fiscal 2014 related to this amendment.  

 

Gain on Change in Fair Value of Contingent Assets

 

The Company recorded a benefit of approximately $64,000 during fiscal 2013, related to an assessment of the expected future cash flows of the Globalrange Earn-out Receivable.  The assessment performed in fiscal 2014 resulted in no change in fair market value.

 

22


 

Gain on Change in Fair Value of Contingent Assets

In fiscal 2011 the Company sold the assets related to our electronic data interchange business for the agricultural chemicals industry.  Part of the sale price consisted of an earn-out to be paid over a four-year period based on the collections received by the acquirer.  Proceeds received from the earn-out have exceeded our initial estimates, and in  fiscal 2013 we recorded a  gain of $64,000 or $0.01 per basic and diluted share as a result of the change in estimate of future earn-out payments expected to be received.

 

Acquisitions 

On September 30, 2014, we completed the acquisition of TCS, a leading provider of software, websites and marketing services designed exclusively for the automotive tire and wheel vertical.  See Note 15 Subsequent Events for a description of the TCS acquisition and the related transactions.

On November 5, 2013, the Company acquired the assets of DUO Web Solutions, a leading provider of social media and online marketing services for the powersports industry.  The transaction was not material to the Company’s financial statements.

On November 28, 2012, the Company, through a wholly-owned subsidiary, completed the acquisition of the assets of the Retail Services Division of Fifty Below Sales & Marketing, Inc., a leading provider of eCommerce websites in the powersports, ATW and HME industries for a purchase price of $5,000,000 and the assumption of contracts having deferred revenue originally valued in the amount of $4,601,000.  The Company funded $1,500,000 of the purchase price through a combination of the Company’s operating cash flows and availability under its existing credit facilities.  The balance of the purchase price was funded through a term note with a significant shareholder. 

On August 17, 2012, the Company acquired substantially all of the assets of Ready2Ride, Incorporated (“Ready2Ride”) pursuant to the terms of an Asset Purchase Agreement dated August 17, 2012.  Ready2Ride marketed aftermarket fitment data to the powersports industry, which furthers ARI’s differentiated content strategy and expands ARI’s product offerings into aftermarket PG&A. Consideration for the acquisition included $500,000 in cash, 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock and assumed liabilities totaling approximately $419,000 and contingent liabilities with an estimated fair market value of approximately $600,000.

Income Taxes

The Company has net deferred tax assets of $6,162,000 as of July 31, 2014, primarily consisting of net operating loss carryforwards (“NOLs”) and book to tax temporary differences. Income tax expense is provided for at the applicable statutory tax rate applied to current U.S. income before taxes, plus or minus any adjustments to the deferred tax assets and to the estimated valuation allowance against deferred tax assets.  Income tax expense, if any, does not represent a significant current cash obligation, as we continue to have NOLs to offset substantially all of the taxable income. 

 

We had income tax expense of $241,000 during fiscal 2014, compared to an income tax benefit of $1,133,000 during fiscal 2013.  We recorded a tax benefit related to a change in estimate of the valuation allowance against future NOLs of $32,000 during fiscal 2014 and $1,341,000 during fiscal 2013, because of expected increases in future taxable income.  We paid income taxes of $106,000 and $91,000 during fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively, primarily related to statutory alternative minimum taxes.  Income tax expense may vary from period to period as we continue to evaluate the valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets.

We also have NOLs related to tax losses incurred by our Netherlands operation.  We have determined that, consistent with prior periods, it is not likely that the net operating losses will be utilized and therefore, a full valuation allowance is recorded, resulting in $0 net deferred tax assets related to the Netherlands operation at July 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, certain cash flow information derived from our financial statements:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014

 

2013

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

$

2,383 

 

$

2,404 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(2,818)

 

 

(4,800)

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

 

51 

 

 

3,249 

Effect of foreign currency exchange rate changes on cash

 

 

(3)

 

 

(8)

Net change in cash

 

$

(387)

 

$

845 

Cash at end of period

 

$

1,808 

 

$

2,195 

 

We utilized $387,000 of net cash during fiscal 2014, compared to generation of $845,000 in fiscal 2013We generated net cash provided by operating activities of $2,383,000 during fiscal 2014 compared to $2,404,000 during fiscal 2013. 

23


 

Cash used in investing activities decreased 40.7% or $1,955,000 in fiscal 2014, compared to the same period last year.  We paid net cash of $490,000 in acquisition related investments, capitalized $1,798,000 of software development costs, and acquired technology equipment of $658,000 during fiscal 2014.   We paid net cash of $2,479,000 for the acquisitions of Ready2Ride and 50 Below, capitalized $1,746,000 of software development costs, and acquired technology equipment of $722,000 during fiscal 2013. We will continue to invest cash in the business to further our growth strategies previously discussed.

Net cash provided from financing activities was $45,000 during fiscal 2014, as the Company received cash proceeds of $312,000 related to capital leases and $283,000 from the issuance of common stock, offset in part by debt payments of $550,000Net cash provided by financing activities was $3,249,000 in fiscal 2013, as the Company borrowed an additional $1,000,000 of debt from Fifth Third, under its previous credit facilities, to fund its acquisition of Ready2Ride in August 2012 and borrowed an additional $3,500,000 from an affiliate of a shareholder for its acquisition of 50 below in November 2012.  The Company paid off $4,300,000 of debt with the proceeds from the March 2013 equity offering and the remaining debt was refinanced in April 2013 under more favorable payment terms.

The Company borrowed an additional $2.1 million on the Silicon Valley Bank (“SVB”) term note and $1.5 million on the SVB revolving credit line (each as described below) to partially fund its acquisition of TCS on September 30, 2014.  The Company also issued two promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $3,000,000 in connection with the TCS acquisition to the former owners of TCS (see Note 15 Subsequent Events for additional information).  

Management believes that current cash balances and its ability to generate cash from operations are sufficient to fund our needs over the next twelve months, although additional financing may be necessary if the Company were to complete a material acquisition or to make a large investment in its business.

Debt

Silicon Valley Bank

On April 26, 2013, the Company entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the “Agreement”) with Silicon Valley Bank (“SVB”), pursuant to which SVB extended to the Company credit facilities consisting of a $3,000,000 revolving credit facility with a maturity date of April 26, 2015 and a $4,500,000 term loan with a maturity date of April 26, 2018.  The Agreement replaced the Company’s Loan and Security Agreement with Fifth Third Bank, which is described below.

The following is a description of the terms of the Agreement as of July 31, 2014.  On September 30, 2014, in connection with the Company’s acquisition of TCS, the Company entered into the First Loan Modification Agreement (the “Modification Agreement”) with SVB, which contained substantial amendments to the terms of the Agreement.  See Note 15 Subsequent Events for a description of the TCS acquisition and the terms of the Agreement as amended by the Modification Agreement.

At July 31, 2014, the term loan and any loans made under the SVB revolving credit facility accrued interest at a per annum rate equal to one or more of the following, as selected by SVB:  (a) the one, two or three-month LIBOR Rate (as defined in the Agreement, subject to a floor of 1.00%), plus the Applicable Margin for LIBOR Loans set forth in the chart below, determined based on the most recent senior leverage ratio, total senior indebtedness to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (“EBITDA”), calculated by SVB on a quarterly basis (the “Senior Leverage Ratio”); or (b) the Prime rate plus the Applicable Margin for Prime Rate Loans set forth in the chart below determined based on the Senior Leverage Ratio (effective rate of 3.75% at July 31, 2014).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Applicable Margin

 

Applicable Margin

Senior Leverage Ratio

 

for Libor Loans

 

for Prime Rate Loans

>= 1.75 to 1.0:

 

3.25 

%

 

1.00 

%

> 1.25 to 1.00 but <1.75 to 1.00:

 

3.00 

%

 

0.75 

%

<= 1.25 to 1.00:

 

2.75 

%

 

0.50 

%

 

Principal in respect of any loans made under the revolving facility is required to be paid in its entirety on or before April 26, 2015.  Principal in respect of the term loan is required to be paid in quarterly installments on the first day of each fiscal quarter of the Company, which were as follows as of July 31, 2014:  $112,500 commencing on August 1, 2013 through May 1, 2014; $168,750 commencing on August 1, 2014 through May 1, 2015; and $281,250 commencing on August 1, 2015 through February 1, 2018.  All remaining principal in respect of the term loan was due and payable on April 26, 2018.  The Company is permitted to prepay all of, but not less than all of, the outstanding principal amount of the term loan upon certain notice to SVB and, in certain circumstances, the payment of a prepayment penalty of up to $90,000 as of July 31, 2014.

24


 

The Agreement contains covenants that restrict, among other things and subject to certain conditions, the ability of the Company to permit a change of control, incur debt, create liens on its assets, make certain investments, enter into merger or acquisition transactions and make distributions to its shareholders. As of July 31, 2014, financial covenants included the maintenance of a minimum Senior Leverage Ratio equal to or less than 2.00 to 1.00, and the maintenance of a Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio (as defined in the Agreement) equal to or greater than 1.25 to 1.00. The Agreement also contains customary events of default that, if triggered, could result in an acceleration of the Company’s obligations under the Agreement.  The loans are secured by a first priority security interest in substantially all assets of the Company.  The Company was in compliance with its debt covenants at July 31, 2014. 

Fifth Third Bank

On July 27, 2011, the Company entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the “Loan and Security Agreement”) with Fifth Third Bank (“Fifth Third”).  Pursuant to the terms of the Loan and Security Agreement, Fifth Third extended to the Company credit facilities consisting of a $1,500,000 revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Loan”) and a $5,000,000 term loan facility (the “Term Loan” and, together with the Revolving Loan, the “Credit Facilities”). 

On August 17, 2012, the Credit Facilities were amended to increase the principal amount of the Term Loan by $1,000,000, and extend the maturity date to December 15, 2014.  Each of the Credit Facilities bore interest at a rate based on the one, two, three or six month LIBOR (as selected by the Company on the last business day of each month) plus 4.0%.

On November 28, 2012 the Credit Facilities were further amended to waive the provisions of the Agreement that would prohibit ARI’s acquisition of 50 Below and the financing of $3,500,000 of the acquisition with a secured subordinated promissory note in the same amount.  Under the amendment, Fifth Third consented to the acquisition of the 50 Below assets and the related transactions and provided waivers of certain provisions of the Credit Facilities, subject to certain terms and conditions.  Such terms and conditions included, among others:  (i) amendments to the fixed charge coverage ratio and senior leverage (maximum senior funded debt to EBITDA) ratio financial covenants; (ii) the addition of a maximum total funded debt to EBITDA ratio financial covenant; (iii) amendment of the revolving loan and term loan maturity dates from July 27, 2014 to December 15, 2013; and (iv) other customary terms and conditions.

On March 8, 2013, the Company entered into the Third Amendment to the Loan and Security Agreement.  The Third Amendment was intended for the following purposes:  (i) to amend the definition of EBITDA to permit adjustments for certain non-recurring transaction expenses and certain other non-cash expenses; (ii) to amend the required fixed charge coverage ratio for the rolling four fiscal quarter periods ending January 31, 2013 and April 30, 2013 to 0.90x and 1.00x, respectively; (iii) to restrict the Company’s ability to enter into certain transactions without the prior written consent of Fifth Third, including, without limitation, certain change in control transactions, reclassifications, reorganizations and recapitalizations of the Company’s Common Stock; and (iv) to permit the Company to use the net cash proceeds from an equity raise transaction in excess of $1,500,000 for working capital or to prepay the outstanding principal balance under other debt obligations described below.  The Loan Agreement Amendment also contained Fifth Third Bank’s consent to the Company raising additional capital by selling and issuing additional equity securities, and waivers by Fifth Third of the provisions of the Loan and Security Agreement that would otherwise have prohibited such a transaction, subject to certain terms and conditions.  All amounts owed under the Loan and Security Agreement were paid in full as of April 26, 2013 in connection with the Company’s entry into the Agreement with SVB, as described above.

Sifen Note

On November 28, 2012, the Company issued a Secured Non-Negotiable Subordinated Promissory Note (the “Sifen Note”) to Michael D. Sifen, Inc. (the “Holder”), an affiliate of an existing shareholder of the Company, in aggregate principal amount of $3,500,000, the proceeds of which were used to partially fund the 50 Below acquisition.  Interest accrued on the outstanding unpaid principal under the Sifen Note at a rate of 10.0% per annum.  Accrued interest only was payable quarterly commencing on February 28, 2013 and continuing until May 28, 2016, at which time all accrued interest and outstanding principal would be due and payable in full.  As partial consideration for the Sifen Note, the Company issued 440,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to the Holder valued at approximately $585,000, which was recorded as a reduction to long-term debt and was being amortized to interest expense over the life of the note.  A portion of the outstanding balance on the Sifen Note was retired in March 2013 in connection with the Holder’s acquisition of Company common stock under the Securities Purchase Agreement, described in Note 9 to the consolidated financial statements, and the remaining balance on the Sifen Note was paid in full as of April 26, 2013.

During fiscal 2013, the Company recognized a loss on the early extinguishment of the Sifen Note and Fifth Third Bank debt totaling $682,000 related to unamortized deferred loan fees and debt discount.

25


 

The following table sets forth certain information related to the Company’s long-term debt, derived from our audited balance sheet as of July 31, 2014 and 2013 (in thousands): 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 31

 

July 31

 

2014

 

2013

Notes payable principal

$

4,050 

 

$

4,500 

Less current maturities

 

(675)

 

 

(450)

Notes payable - non-current

$

3,375 

 

$

4,050 

 

Minimum principal payments due on the Term Loan are as follows for the fiscal years ending July 31, (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015

 

 

 

$

675 

2016

 

 

 

 

1,125 

2017

 

 

 

 

1,125 

2018

 

 

 

 

1,125 

 

 

 

 

$

4,050 

 

Leases 

We lease office space and certain office equipment under capital and operating lease arrangements expiring through 2021.  The following table shows our remaining obligations under these arrangements as of July 31, 2014 (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital

 

Operating

Fiscal Year Ending July 31:

Leases

 

Leases

2015

$

213 

 

$

667 

2016

 

141 

 

 

514 

2017

 

54 

 

 

510 

2018

 

58 

 

 

413 

2019

 

27 

 

 

349 

Thereafter

 

 —

 

 

715 

Total minimum lease payments

 

493 

 

 

3,168 

Less amounts related to interest

 

(66)

 

 

 —

Net minimum lease payments

$

428 

 

$

3,168 

 

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company’s discussion and analysis of its financial condition and results of operations are based upon its financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). The preparation of financial statements in conformance with GAAP requires estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. The SEC has defined a company’s critical accounting policies as the ones that are most important to the portrayal of a company’s financial condition and results of operations, and which require us to make our most difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates of matters that are inherently uncertain.  Based on this definition, we have identified as the most critical accounting policies and judgments those addressed below.  We also have other key accounting policies, which involve the use of estimates, judgments, and assumptions that are significant to understanding our results.  For additional information, refer to Note 1 of the consolidated financial statements, which appear elsewhere within this report on Form 10-K.  Although we believe that our estimates, assumptions, and judgments are reasonable, they are based upon information currently available.  Actual results may differ significantly from these estimates under different assumptions, judgments, or conditions.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue from software licenses, annual or periodic maintenance fees and catalog subscription fees are all recognized ratably over the contractual term of the arrangement. ARI considers all arrangements with payment terms extending beyond twelve months not to be fixed or determinable and evaluates other arrangements with payment terms longer than normal to determine whether the arrangement is fixed or determinable. If the fee is not fixed or determinable, revenue is recognized as payments become due from the customer. Arrangements that include acceptance terms beyond the standard terms are not recognized until acceptance has occurred. If collectability is not considered probable, revenue is recognized when the fee is collected.

26


 

Revenues for professional services to customize complex features and functionality in a product’s base software code or develop complex interfaces within a customer’s environment are recognized as the services are performed.  When the current estimates of total contract revenue for professional services and the total related costs indicate a loss, a provision for the entire loss on the contract is made in the period the amount is determined.  Professional services revenue for set-up and integration of hosted websites, or other services considered essential to the functionality of other elements of this type of arrangement, is amortized over the term of the contract.

Revenue for use of the network and for information services is recognized on a straight-line basis over the period of the contract.  Revenue for variable transaction fees, primarily for use of the shopping cart feature of our websites, is recognized as it is earned. Amounts invoiced to customers prior to recognition as revenue, as discussed above, are reflected in the accompanying balance sheets as deferred revenue. Amounts received for shipping and handling fees are reflected in revenue.  Costs incurred for shipping and handling are reported in cost of revenue.

Trade Receivables, Credit Policy and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

Trade receivables are uncollateralized customer obligations due on normal trade terms, most of which require payment within thirty (30) days from the invoice date.  Payments of trade receivables are allocated to the specific invoices identified on the customer’s remittance advice or, if unspecified, are applied to the earliest unpaid invoices.

The carrying amount of trade receivables is reduced by an allowance that reflects management’s best estimate of the amounts that will not be collected.  Management individually reviews receivable balances based on an assessment of current creditworthiness, estimates the portion of the balance that will not be collected. The allowance for potential doubtful accounts is reflected as an offset to trade receivables in the accompanying balance sheets. 

Deferred Loan Fees and Debt Discounts

Fees associated with securing debt are capitalized and included in prepaid and other and other long term assets on the consolidated balance sheet.  Stock issued in connection with securing debt is recorded to debt discount, reducing the carrying amount of the debt on the consolidated balance sheet.  Deferred loan fees and debt discounts are amortized to interest expense over the life of the debt using the effective interest method.

Common Stock Warrants

ARI issued common stock warrants in connection with equity financing arrangements in fiscal 2013.  The terms of the agreements were assessed to determine whether the instruments qualified as an equity arrangement or a debt arrangement.  Arrangements determined to be derivatives are recorded at fair value on the consolidated balance sheet, with periodic gains and losses related to the change in fair value recorded to earnings on the consolidated statement of operations.  Because the Company’s warrants have no comparable market data to determine fair value, the Company hired an independent valuation firm to value the warrants using Level 3 inputs at the estimated price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date using an open form simulation model.  The primary factors used to determine the fair value include: (i) the fair value of the Company’s common stock; (ii) the volatility of the Company’s common stock; (iii) the risk free interest rate; (iv) the estimated likelihood and timing of exercise; and (v) the estimated likelihood and timing of a future financing arrangement.  Increases in the market value of the Company’s common stock and volatility, which have the most impact on the fair value of the warrants, would cause the fair value of the warrants to increase.

Deferred Income Taxes 

The tax effect of the temporary differences between the book and tax basis of assets and liabilities and the estimated tax benefit from tax net operating losses is reported as deferred tax assets and liabilities in the consolidated balance sheet. An assessment of the likelihood that net deferred tax assets will be realized from future taxable income is performed. Because the ultimate realizability of deferred tax assets is highly subject to the outcome of future events, the amount established as a valuation allowance is considered to be a significant estimate that is subject to change in the near term. To the extent a valuation allowance is established or there is a change in the allowance during a period, the change is reflected with a corresponding increase or decrease in the tax provision in the statement of income.  Future events that could have a material impact on the valuation allowance include, but are not limited to, acquisitions and changes in tax legislation.

Stock-Based Compensation 

We use the Black-Scholes model to value stock options granted. Expected volatility is based on historical volatility of the Company’s stock. The expected life of options granted represents the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding. The risk-free rate for periods within the contractual term of the options is based on the U.S. Treasury yields in effect at the time of grant. As stock-based compensation expense recognized in our results of operations is based on awards ultimately expected to vest, the amount has been reduced for estimated forfeitures, which were estimated based on our historical experience.  Management reviews the critical assumptions used in the Black-Scholes model each quarter and adjusts those assumptions when necessary.

27


 

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

As fully described in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, we annually review the carrying value of goodwill to determine whether an impairment may exist.  We determined that there is a single reporting unit for the purpose of goodwill impairment testing.  We estimate the fair value of the reporting unit using various valuation techniques, with our primary techniques being a discounted cash flow valuation and control premium adjusted market capitalization. There are many estimates and assumptions involved in preparing a discounted cash flow analysis, including estimating future operating results, selecting a weighted average cost of capital to discount estimated future cash flows, anticipated long-term growth rates, and future profit margins.

Estimating the fair value of a reporting unit is an inherently subjective process.  Changes in assumptions, estimates, and other inputs could result in the indication of potential impairment of a portion of the recorded goodwill.  Management believes the assumptions, estimates, and other inputs used reflect our best efforts and are appropriate for valuing the reporting unit.  Our goodwill impairment test indicated that goodwill was not impaired in fiscal 2014 or fiscal 2013.

Impairment tests are also performed for those intangible assets with estimable useful lives if circumstances warrant a review. 

Earn-out Receivable

As part of the purchase price for the disposition of our AgChem EDI business, we recorded an earn-out receivable with anticipated payments to ARI annually over a four-year period following the closing date. The earn-out was recorded at fair value, which was the estimated future receipts less an imputed discount, based on the present value of the estimated earn-out payments, discounted at an imputed interest rate at the time the note is issued and any subsequent changes in prevailing interest rates shall be ignored.  Imputed interest is amortized to interest income over the life of the earn-out.  Actual earn-out receipts may vary from the estimated earn-out if the buyer’s revenues are higher or lower than estimated.  Historical receipts to date have been 29% higher than originally estimated.

Quarterly Financial Data 

The following table sets forth the unaudited results of operations for each of the eight quarterly periods ended July 31, 2014, prepared on a basis consistent with the audited financial statements, reflecting all normal recurring adjustments that are considered necessary. The quarterly information is as follows (in thousands, except per share data):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st Quarter

 

2nd Quarter

 

3rd Quarter

 

4th Quarter

 

2014

 

2013

 

2014

 

2013

 

2014

 

2013

 

2014

 

2013

Net revenues

$

8,160 

 

$

5,942 

 

$

8,135 

 

$

7,478 

 

$

8,176 

 

$

8,228 

 

$

8,548 

 

$

8,454 

Gross margin

$

6,600 

 

$

4,534 

 

$

6,449 

 

$

5,757 

 

$

6,616 

 

$

6,343 

 

$

6,976 

 

$

6,832 

Net income (loss)

$

25 

 

$

112 

 

$

(461)

 

$

 

$

160 

 

$

(571)

 

$

174 

 

$

(298)

Basic and diluted net income per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

$

0.00 

 

$

0.01 

 

$

(0.03)

 

$

0.00 

 

$

0.01 

 

$

(0.05)

 

$

0.01 

 

$

(0.02)

Diluted

$

0.00 

 

$

0.01 

 

$

(0.03)

 

$

0.00 

 

$

0.01 

 

$

(0.05)

 

$

0.01 

 

$

(0.02)

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

ARI has no significant off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a material current or future effect on its financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.

 

Item 7A.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and are not required to provide the information under this item.

 

Item 8.  Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

Reference is made to the consolidated financial statements, the reports thereon and the notes thereto commencing after the signature page of this Report, which are incorporated herein by reference.

 

Item 9.  Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure    

None.

 

28


 

Item 9A.  Controls and Procedures

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act, as amended, is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the required time periods and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow for timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

As required by Rule 13a-15 under the Exchange Act, we have completed an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness and the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of July 31, 2014.  Based upon this evaluation, our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, has concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of July 31, 2014.  

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control over Financial Reporting – Guidance for Smaller Public Companies issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on our evaluation under this framework, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of July 31, 2014.  

This Annual Report on Form 10-K does not include an attestation report of our independent registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Internal control over financial reporting was not subject to attestation by our independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to the amendments to Rule 2-02(f) of Regulation S-X that exempt us from this attestation requirement based on our status as a non-accelerated filer.  We are required to provide only management’s report in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Changes in Internal Controls

There were no changes to the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the year ended July 31, 2014 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls and Procedures

Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our internal controls will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include, but are not limited to, the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

 

Item 9B.  Other Information

None.

 

29


 

PART III

Item 10.  Directors, Executive Officers, and Corporate Governance

Information Regarding Directors

The Company’s directors are divided into three classes, with staggered terms of three years each.  At the annual meeting, which is scheduled to be held on January 6, 2015, shareholders will vote on the election of two directors nominated by the Company’s Board of Directors to serve until the Company’s fiscal 2018 annual meeting of shareholders and until their successors are elected and qualifiedThe following list identifies all current directors of the Company:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name

 

Age

 

Capacity Served

William H. Luden, III

 

72

 

Chairman of the Board, Director

Roy W. Olivier

 

55

 

President, Chief Executive Officer and Director

Chad J. Cooper

 

44

 

Director

James R. Johnson

 

68

 

Director

P. Lee Poseidon

 

59

 

Director

William C. Mortimore

 

69

 

Director

Robert Y, Newell, IV

 

66

 

Director

Nominees for Election to Serve Until the Fiscal 2018 Annual Meeting

Roy W. Olivier

Mr. Olivier joined the Company in September 2006 as Vice President of Global Sales and Marketing, and was appointed as President and CEO in May 2008.  He has been a director since 2008.  Before joining ARI, Mr. Olivier was a consultant to start-up, small and medium-sized businesses.  Prior to that, he was Vice President of Sales and Marketing for ProQuest Media Solutions, a business he founded in 1993 and sold to ProQuest in 2000.  Before that, Mr. Olivier held various sales and marketing executive and managerial positions with several other companies in the telecommunications and computer industries, including Multicom Publishing Inc., BusinessLand and PacTel.

The Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of the Board of Directors (the “Nominating Committee”) believes that Mr. Olivier’s experience with the Company as its President, Chief Executive Officer, and director, as well as his prior experience as the Company’s Vice President of Global Sales and Marketing, as well as his other business and industry background, has given him substantial and valuable knowledge of all aspects of the Company’s business.

P. Lee Poseidon

Mr. Poseidon was appointed to the Board of Directors in June of 2008.  Mr. Poseidon’s business experience includes his services as Venture Partner at Jumpstart, Inc., and Chief Operating Officer at Quorum Information Technologies and at the National Automobile Dealers Association.  From 2001 to 2003, he served as Senior Vice President and General Manager of ProQuest’s Global Automotive business unit.  Prior to joining ProQuest, Mr. Poseidon spent 15 years in a series of executive positions in marketing, business development, product management and strategic planning at The Reynolds and Reynolds Company.  His early career included financial analysis and management positions at NCR Corporation.  Mr. Poseidon earned his MBA from Xavier University and his B.A. from Ohio Wesleyan University.

The Nominating Committee believes that the Board benefits from the extensive management, business and industry experience Mr. Poseidon has obtained through his positions with a number of technology, publishing, manufacturing, distribution, and professional services businesses.  In addition, Mr. Poseidon’s experience as a director of the Company and his membership on various committees has provided him with a deep understanding of the business of the Company and makes him a valuable member of the Board of Directors.

30


 

Directors Whose Terms Expire at the Fiscal 2016 Annual Meeting

 

Chad J. Cooper

Mr. Cooper, a director since October 2014, is the Chief Executive Officer of Digital Offering LLC, a technology-driven merchant bank.  He has more than 15 years’ experience in the investment banking and capital markets industry.  Prior to joining Digital Offering, Mr. Cooper was a Managing Director at at Ascendiant Capital Markets from 2013-2014.  Prior to Ascendiant, Mr. Cooper was a Managing Director at Global Hunter Securities, an investment bank, from 2012 to 2013.  Mr. Cooper also served as Director of Institutional Sales and in other various capacities at Roth Capital Partners, an investment bank, from 2002 to 2011.  Mr. Cooper holds a B.A. in International Relations from the University of Southern California, and an M.B.A. from Georgetown University.

The Nominating Committee believes that Mr. Cooper’s background and experience in investment banking and capital markets provide significant benefits to the Board as the Company continues to execute its growth strategy.

James R. Johnson

Mr. Johnson, a director since April 2012, served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BakBone Software, Inc., a provider of data protection technology, from November 2004 until April 2010.  Before joining BakBone, Mr. Johnson served as President and Chief Technology Officer of the Hospitality Group of SoftBrands Inc., an enterprise software company.  Prior to joining SoftBrands, Mr. Johnson was President and Senior Vice President of the Asia Pacific Group of Sterling Commerce.  Currently, Mr. Johnson serves as one of the founding directors on the board of Lister Technologies (P) Ltd, a privately-held offshore development company located in Chennai, India.  Mr. Johnson holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Operational Research from California State University, Fresno.

The Board of Directors believes that Mr. Johnson’s breadth and depth of firsthand knowledge of the international marketplace and successful track record of growing global software and enterprise applications services companies make him a valuable member of the Board of Directors.

William H. Luden, III

Mr. Luden, a director since March 2012,  served as Chief Executive Officer of InfoPartners, Inc., which provides information systems management and consulting services to hospitals, from 2002 until 2010.  Prior to InfoPartners, Mr. Luden held CEO positions with several technology companies, including ShowMeTV, Purdy Electronics and Corporate Finance Associates.  Earlier in his career, he served as CEO of the InfoSystems and Cellular One divisions of Pacific Telesis, and owned Crisman AudioVision, a chain of high-end stereo retail stores in the Rocky Mountain area.  Mr. Luden holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy from the University of Colorado-Boulder and a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School.

The Nominating Committee believes that the Board benefits from Mr. Luden’s extensive experience and proven track record of growing businesses and his strong connections in the technology industry, which the Board believes will be a valuable asset to the Board of Directors as the Company continues its strategic and tactical development.

Directors Whose Terms Expire at the Fiscal 2017 Annual Meeting

William C. Mortimore

Mr. Mortimore, a director since 2004, has been on the Audit Committee since 2004 and has been the Audit Committee Chair since 2007.  Mr. Mortimore has been the Managing Director of Keystone Insights, LLC, a provider of high technology solutions, since 2009.  Mr. Mortimore was the founder of Merge Technologies Incorporated (“MTI”) and was its Chief Strategist from September 2000 until July 2006, Interim Chief Executive Officer from May 2006 until July 2006, Chairman of the Board from September 2000 until May 2006, President and Chief Executive Officer from November 1987 through August 2000 and a member of the Board of Directors since its inception in November 1987 until July 2006.  MTI is a global healthcare software and services company that trades on the NASDAQ Stock Market under the symbol MRGE.  Mr. Mortimore has served as co-founder and a senior manager of several businesses in the fields of information communications technology, healthcare services and real estate and has been responsible for securing public and private financing for these organizations.  Mr. Mortimore is an original member of the American College of Radiology/National Association of Electrical Manufacturers committee responsible for establishing and maintaining the DICOM medical imaging standard.  Mr. Mortimore has also served as a member of the Board of Directors of MRI Devices, Inc., a privately held diagnostic imaging manufacturer, from November 2002 until its sale to Intermagnetics General Corporation in mid-2004.  Mr. Mortimore received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Michigan State University, an M.E.E. from the University of Minnesota and pursued doctoral studies in Electrical Engineering at the University of Minnesota.

31


 

The Nominating Committee believes that the Board benefits from Mr. Mortimore’s substantial technical and management experience, which he has obtained through his positions with various healthcare and information technology companies, as well as public company leadership and shareholder value growth experience.  In addition, Mr. Mortimore’s experience as a director of the Company, Chairman of the Audit Committee and the “audit committee financial expert,” has provided him with an in-depth understanding of the business of the Company and the markets in which it competes.

Robert Y. Newell, IV

Mr. Newell was appointed to the Board of Directors in November of 2012.  Since 2003, Mr. Newell has been the Chief Financial Officer of Cardica, Inc., (NASDAQ: CRDC), a publicly traded designer and manufacturer of surgical devices.  Prior to this, he was the Chief Financial Officer of Omnicell, a hospital supply and medication management company.  He was a partner in the Beta Group, a business development firm from 1998 to 1999.  From 1992 to 1997, he was Chief Financial Officer of Cardiometrics.  He has held financial management positions with medical and technology companies in the Silicon Valley for over 25 years and has completed four initial public offerings.  Prior to his business career, he was a pilot in the United States Air Force.  He received a BA in mathematics from the College of William & Mary and an MBA from the Harvard Business School.

The Nominating Committee believes that the Board benefits from Mr. Newell’s substantial financial and public company experience, which he has obtained through his financial management positions with various medical and technology companies.

Executive Officers

 

Information regarding the Company’s executive officers is provided above under “Item I. Business – Executive Officers of the Registrant.”

 

Audit Committee

The Company’s Board of Directors has established an Audit Committee that currently is composed of Mr. Mortimore (chairman), Mr. Johnson, Mr. Luden and Mr. Newell.  Information regarding the functions performed by the Audit Committee, its membership, and the number of meetings held during fiscal 2014 is provided in the “Report of the Audit Committee” included in this annual report on Form 10-K.  The Board of Directors has determined that Mr. Mortimore is an “audit committee financial expert” and is “independent” as those terms are defined under the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) regulations and the listing standards of the NASDAQ Stock Market.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

Based solely upon its review of Forms 3 and 4 and amendments thereto furnished to the Company during fiscal 2014 pursuant to Section 16 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, all of such forms were filed on a timely basis by or on behalf of reporting persons during fiscal 2014.

Code of Ethics

The Company has adopted a code of ethics that applies to all employees, including our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller and persons performing similar functions.  The code of ethics is designed to promote honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of conflicts of interest, compliance with applicable laws, and full, accurate, timely and understandable disclosure in reports we send to our shareholders or file with the SEC.  Violations of the code of ethics are to be reported to the Audit Committee.  A copy of the code of ethics is available online at www.investor.arinet.com or may be obtained, without charge, by sending a request to ARI Network Services, Inc., Attention:  Chief Financial Officer, 10850 West Park Place, Suite 1200, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53224.

 

32


 

Item 11.  Executive Compensation

 

Executive Compensation

The following table sets forth compensation for the Company’s fiscal year ended July 31, 2014 for Mr. Olivier, the Company’s chief executive officer, William A. Nurthen and Marvin A. Berg, who were the Company’s next two most highly compensated executive officers at the end of fiscal 2014.  We refer to these individuals collectively as the Company’s “named executive officers.”

Summary Compensation Table

Or acc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Incentive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plan

 

All Other

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock

 

Option

 

Compensa-

 

Compensa-

 

 

Name and Principal Position

 

Year

 

Salary

 

Bonus (1)

 

Awards (2)

 

Awards (3)

 

tion (4)

 

tion (5)

 

Total

Roy W. Olivier,

 

2014 

 

$

310,000 

 

$

 —

 

$

57,889 

 

$

194,771 

 

$

99,775 

 

$

6,076 

 

$

668,511 

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

2013 

 

 

285,000 

 

$

40,000 

 

$

22,500 

 

$

 —

 

 

117,188 

 

 

6,404 

 

 

471,092 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William A. Nurthen (6),

 

2014 

 

$

151,442 

 

$

10,000 

 

$

 —

 

$

146,644 

 

$

46,333 

 

$

2,423 

 

$

357,843 

Chief Financial Officer, Treasurer and Secretary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marvin A. Berg III,

 

2014 

 

$

190,000 

 

$

 —

 

$

14,336 

 

$

 —

 

$

48,437 

 

$

4,362 

 

$

257,135 

Vice President of Operations

 

2013 

 

 

180,000 

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

28,125 

 

 

3,737 

 

 

211,862 

 

(1)

Fiscal 2014 amount represents a sign on bonus paid to Mr. Nurthen in November 2013.

(2)

The values set forth in this column represent the grant date fair values computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 for the applicable fiscal year, disregarding the estimate of forfeitures for service-based vesting conditions.   Amounts shown for fiscal 2014 represent restricted stock awards earned under the 2013 LTEB plan, but granted in fiscal 2014.  The assumptions used to determine these values are described in “Stock-Based Compensation,” Note 10 to the Consolidated Statements.

(3)

The values set forth in this column represent the grant date fair values computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718 for the applicable fiscal year, disregarding the estimate of forfeitures for service-based vesting conditions. The assumptions used to determine these values are described in “Stock-Based Compensation,” Note 10 to the Consolidated Statements.

(4)

Amounts shown for fiscal 2013 represent annual incentive payments in cash and common stock earned during fiscal 2013.  Amounts shown for fiscal 2014 represent annual incentive payments and payments made under the LTEB plan in cash to cover taxes on awards earned during fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2014, respectively as follows:  Mr. Olivier—$68,600, $57,889, and $25,156; Mr. Nurthen—$46,333, $0 and $6,133; and Mr. Berg—$41,175, $14,338 and $6,161.

(5)

Amounts represent a Company match under the Company’s 401(k) plan.

(6)

William A. Nurthen commenced employment with the Company effective November 29, 2013.

 

Stock Option Grants

All of the Company’s employee stock option grants qualify as incentive stock options up to the $100,000 per year limitation and, with limited exceptions, vest 25% per year on July 31, provided the participant is an employee of the Company at such date.  Options are exercisable up to ten years after the date of grant, one year from the date of a termination of employment upon death or disability of the participant, and 90 days from the date of termination for any reason other than “cause” or immediately upon termination for “cause.”

Annual Incentive Compensation

The annual component of the Company’s Management Incentive Bonus Plan (“MIBP”) provides for annual cash incentives for the participants, which included Mr. Olivier, Mr. Nurthen and Mr. Berg, among others.  The amount of the annual incentive opportunity was based on two management bonus objectives (“MBOs”) for each of the four fiscal quarters agreed upon by the executive officer and the chief executive officer (or Compensation Committee for the CEO) at the beginning of fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013.  Each employee’s objectives are designed to align with the Company’s core strategies.

Under the MIBP for fiscal 2014, participants were eligible for a payout of up to 100% of the quarterly incentives based on achievement of performance toward each of the established objectives.  At the end of the fiscal year, participants employed by the Company became eligible for an additional payment (subject to a maximum of 150%) based on the Company’s overall performance against its MBOs.  The combined results for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2014 under the annual incentive arrangements described above resulted in payouts of 92% of the participants’ target incentive amounts for the fiscal years ended July 31, 2014.

33


 

Equity Performance Bonus Plan

Effective beginning in fiscal 2013, the Company established a Long Term Executive Bonus Plan (“LTEB”) for Executives of ARI.  The purpose of the LTEB is to advance the interests of ARI by providing a competitive level of incentive for eligible executives, which will encourage them to more closely identify with shareholder interests and to place additional emphasis on achieving the corporate strategic objectives.  In addition, the LTEB is intended to attract and retain key executives by offering a competitive incentive program based on ownership in ARI.

The LTEB is administered by the Compensation Committee.  All Awards require the approval of the ARI Board of Directors.  The amount of the Award will be determined after the close of the fiscal year based on a percentage of base salary.  Except as otherwise provided by the Committee, awards consist of (i) restricted stock as determined by the closing price of the shares at the time the Committee grants the award, and (ii) cash, to cover the minimum withholding taxes on the Award.  The restricted stock is granted under the ARI 2010 Equity Incentive Plan and vest in four installments beginning on the date of grant and the next three anniversaries of the date of grant.

Performance criteria are approved by the Compensation Committee (after its evaluation of the recommendations of the CEO) as soon as possible after the beginning of each fiscal year and the actual Award is measured based upon the satisfaction of the performance criteria during the fiscal year.  Adjustments may be made, at the sole discretion of the Committee, to the value of the Award where performance results for the fiscal year are below the criteria established for the maximum award.

Except as otherwise determined by the Committee, where the Award is earned by satisfaction of the performance criteria, the portion of the Award to be made in restricted stock will be equal to the dollar amount of (i) 15% of base salary for officers and 25% of base salary for the CEO, less (ii) the minimum amount of any withholding taxes due (as calculated with respect to both the taxes on the restricted stock and the cash portion of the award).  The remaining portion of the award will be paid in cash and will be equal to the minimum amount of withholding taxes required to be withheld by ARI in connection with the full value of the Award (restricted stock and cash portions).  In determining the minimum amount of withholding taxes required to be withheld by ARI, it will be assumed and is required that all recipients will make a Code Section 83(b) election at the time they receive the restricted stock portion of the Award.  The cash portion of such Award will be paid (in the form of withholding taxes) on the same date as the grant date of the restricted stock or on the first payroll date immediately thereafter.  Executives may not transfer vested shares of restricted stock for at least one year after the grant date.  Executives may not sell more than 50% of their accumulated vested restricted shares until terminating employment.  Upon termination of employment, any unvested restricted shares will be forfeited, except as otherwise provided in any Change in Control Agreement between the Executive and ARI.

Shares issued pursuant to the LTEB are expensed over the requisite service period plus the vesting period.  The Company expensed $76,000 and $40,000 in fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively, related to the fiscal 2013 LTEB, pursuant to which shares were issued in January 2014 The Company expensed $85,696 in fiscal 2014 related to the fiscal 2014 LTEB, pursuant to which shares were issued in October 2014.

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Option Awards

 

Stock Awards

 

 

Number of Securities Underlying

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of

 

Market Value

 

 

Unexercised Options

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares or

 

of Shares or

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Option

 

Option

 

Units of

 

Units of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise

 

Expiration

 

Stock that have

 

Stock that have

Name

 

Exercisable

 

Unexercisable

 

Price

 

Date

 

Not Vested

 

Not Vested

Roy W. Olivier

 

50,000 

 

 

 

 

$

2.100 

 

09/15/2016

 

9,000 
(3)

 

$

26,730 
(4)

 

 

300,000 

 

 

 

 

 

1.530 

 

05/01/2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25,000 

 

75,000 

(1)

 

 

3.300 

 

03/04/2024